Tag Archives: Attainment

Wee Blether reflections: The Power of Communities in Education Recovery⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

John Galt, Education Officer CLD, reflects on a recent wee blether hosted by Education Scotland and the CLD Standards Council

The Power of Communities in Education Recovery: Wednesday 5th August

One of our recent ‘Wee Blethers’ focused on what we’re learning about our communities across Scotland during the Covid-19 crisis and what messages that gives us for education recovery. The session was co-facilitated by the CLD Standards Council for Scotland and attracted an interesting mix of practitioners from education establishments, local authorities, community learning and development, third sector organisations and the Scottish Government.

The picture is a complex one. We heard that there is clear evidence that existing inequalities in communities across Scotland are being exacerbated by the Covid-19 crisis. We also heard though about the many examples of positive community-led responses to the crisis, often based on a strong understanding of what is needed locally, and organised around the knowledge and skills in the community to meet those needs.

We discussed the ‘power of communities’ and what a ‘resilient community’ looks like; how engaging with local communities can help to shape the curriculum – e.g. through approaches like Participatory Budgeting or by strengthening youth work and school partnerships; and the key role that community learning and development can play in supporting community-led activities and education recovery. Check out this link for more details https://share.wakelet.com/doc/2AvJL8-Gczc88TAJFyBEK

 

Celebrating the 5th anniversary of the Scottish Attainment Challenge – A blog from our Chief Executive⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

It is incredible to me that it has now been five years since the Scottish Attainment Challenge launched. Those five years may have passed quickly but in that time, I have seen so much excellent work taking place across the country with the aim of closing the attainment gap.

The Challenge proactively aims to ensure that every child has the same opportunity to succeed regardless of their background and circumstances – and many schools have taken a really inventive approach in helping to make this important vision a reality.

I am very impressed by the variety of actions being undertaken by schools across the country to help increase attainment. There is not a ‘one size fits all’ approach to tackling this as sometimes what works for the many will not make a difference for our most vulnerable children.

Many schools are focusing on increasing attainment by considering what happens outside of the school gates by involving parents, developing home-school links, and increasing community support through outreach projects. For example, I was delighted to learn about the work being undertaken at Wallace High School through the Scottish Attainment Challenge to recruit Family Link Workers which support young people and their family, and help them to overcome barriers preventing them from attending school.

Whilst it is fantastic to see this kind of work coming forward, the 5th anniversary provides a useful opportunity to reflect on progress made but also what we need to do next.
We want to accelerate progress, evaluate what has worked well and how we can best drive forward further improvements to narrow the poverty related attainment gap. We want to see even more success stories across the country.

I would like to say a huge thank you to the Attainment Advisors from Education Scotland who have been working in schools across Scotland to support the delivery of the Scottish Attainment Challenge since its launch five years ago. They play a strong role in linking the work of Education Scotland, Scottish Government and Local Authorities to improve educational attainment and to reduce the attainment gap between children from the least and most socially disadvantaged backgrounds.

Reducing the attainment gap is not possible without the many hardworking and dedicated teachers and classroom assistants across Scotland, and I also want to acknowledge and thank them for their efforts in helping to tackle this. I was very interested to learn about the partnership work being undertaken in Renfrewshire through the Challenge to devise and deliver a comprehensive professional learning programme for classroom assistants. This is incredible work and underlines the significant contribution our classroom assistants make to increasing attainment.

We now need to continue to focus on pedagogy, engagement and on developing an irresistible curriculum for our children. There are many children who are not yet where they need to be in terms of attainment but through taking a targeted approach to their lessons, and considering where the gaps in their learning are, teachers are helping these children to become more confident and ensuring they maximise their potential.

Change doesn’t happen overnight and research suggests that educational change can be a marathon rather than a sprint, but I am very encouraged by the strong steps forward which have been made since the launch of the Scottish Attainment Challenge five years ago. With the continued commitment and focus of all key players in the educational system I believe that together we can achieve equity for every child.

Gayle Gorman

DYW Annual Reports⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Governments’ Programme Board for DYW publishes DYW reports to highlight the progress made across the  5 Change Themes.  The following reports have been published so far:

  1. Annual Report 2014-15
  2. Annual Report 2015-16
  3. Annual Report 2016-17
  4. Annual Report 2017-18
  5. Annual Report 2018-19

Briefing on Gaelic Education⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Seo fiosrachadh ùr bhuainn:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/BriefingonGaelicEducationSept2019.pdf 

Please see our September  Briefing on Gaelic Education here:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/BriefingonGaelicEducationSept2019.pdf

Our briefings on Gaelic Education  keep practitioners updated of some of Education Scotland’s, and key partners’, support for improvement in Gaelic Education. Please follow this link for more information:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/learning-resources/Briefings%20on%20Gaelic%20Education/Fiosrachadh%20mun%20Ghàidhlig

Do grades really matter?⤴

from

This week marked the start of the a level results being issued whilst over a week ago the Scottish higher results were issued. And if as predicted, it leads to a greater focus on the number and type of candidates gaining entry to university, is it now time for a rethink?

Interestingly, English students go to school to collect their results, knowing that if things don’t go quite as planned there is support at hand with advice and back up plans able to be put swiftly in place. Conversely, the Scottish system has evolved where most young people receive a text or letter through the post. Any support and advice is generally provided by skills development Scotland rather than school based staff. Although most schools will retain a support offering for students to discuss course choice changes and provide advice.

However, as various announcements are made by political parties about the suitability of the university entries system and suggestions made on how to improve it. Labour propose students receiving an offer based on actual grades once the exam results have been published. Presumably, this would lead to university terms starting later or exams being brought forward into March or April to allow time for results, offers and university places to be accepted.

But isn’t there a better way? Should students who want to go to university simply be allowed to attend, assuming they have provided evidence that they can attain. Maybe not necessarily requiring a grade to join. This would mean universities changing their competitive approach to higher education. However, would quality be reduced? Or would students from disadvantaged backgrounds be more able to gain entry to university?

Would this lead to the suggested devaluing of the National 4 qualification which has a pass/fail approach. I’m not sure it would. I think that have an external, final exam was retained then we would retain the integrity of the qualification.

Would this also ensure that all students continue working hard right up until the end. Reports suggest that some students do not exert the same effort when they receive an unconditional offer. This is despite the fact that the university is making the offer based on the application submitted and the subjects studied being detailed on the application.

Overall, we should consider refocusing the timings of exams, results and university offers so that offers are received towards the end of the academic year. I am not sure the Scottish education system is quite ready yet for a pass/fail approach to higher and subsequent entry into university.

EduBlether

Resources available in Gaelic which support First Minister’s Reading Challenge⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The National Museum of Scotland and the Scottish Book Trust have produced two resources, available online, which support the First Minister’s Reading Challenge. To access these resources please follow the links below:

Cuir sgeulachd ri chèile san taigh-tasgaidh – This resource can be used at any museum across the UK.

Leugh do shlighe timcheall Taigh-tasgaidh Naiseanta na h-Alba! – This resource is for use at the National Museum of Scotland.

 

NQ Support Materials Update⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The NQ support materials for Gàidhlig, Gaelic(Learners) and subjects and courses through the medium of Gaelic, previously hosted on the Education Scotland National Qualifications website are now available on our professional learning community for Gaelic education on Yammer.

It should be noted that these resources no longer fully match the SQA course specifications. However, they do provide a range of useful support on approaches to effective learning, teaching and ongoing classroom assessment, should teachers wish to use them. You will find these resources here.

A glow login is required to access Yammer and membership of the group is also required.

Briefing on Gaelic Education⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Seo fiosrachadh ùr bhuainn:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/documents/briefingongaeliceducationfeb19.pdf

Please see our February Briefing on Gaelic Education here: 

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/documents/briefingongaeliceducationfeb19.pdf

Please follow the link below to view our briefings on Gaelic Education which keep practitioners updated of some of Education Scotland’s, and key partners’, support for improvement in Gaelic Education.

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/learning-resources/Briefings%20on%20Gaelic%20Education/Fiosrachadh%20mun%20Ghàidhlig

 

Gaelic version of e-Sgoil’s live narrative project now available⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Education Scotland has published the Gaelic version of e-Sgoil’s live narrative project here:

https://education.gov.scot/improvement/practice-exemplars/live-narrative-project

This project outlines e-Sgoil’s virtual learning approach to overcoming barriers to learning across a range of local authorities and aspects of pedagogy​. It is intended to assist senior leaders and teachers  with improving practice through the medium of Gaelic and English.

 

e-Sgoil⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

e-Sgoil’s engagement with the Scottish Attainment Challenge is now documented as part of a Live Narrative Project.  This sharing of practice is intended to assist senior leaders and teachers  with improving practice through the medium of Gaelic and English. More information can be found at