Tag Archives: Assessment

Microsoft Classroom – supporting teachers supporting learners⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

msftclassroomscreensWhat is Microsoft Classroom?

In a nutshell, it’s an online environment where a teacher can assign tasks, track who’s completed tasks with ease, or provide feedback to support learners, share in seconds OneNote pages to every individual pupil’s section which can only be seen by the teacher and that individual pupil, have peer-to-peer conversations for collaborative work between learners or for teachers to provide individualised support to learners through teacher-pupil discussions. It joins up features available in Office 365 for Education – the OneNote Class Notebook, messaging, calendar, feedback, groups and email especially for classrooms. It works via a browser, or computer or mobile app for smartphone or tablet.

intromsftclassroommix

Click on this link for an interactive step-by-step guide to Microsoft Classroom, what it looks like, how it works and how a teacher might use it with their learners. This interactive guide takes you through the steps combining video, audio, screenshots as well as inviting you to click on the sections to see what happens and move to the next step to find out how Microsoft Classroom works for a teacher.

https://classroom.cloudguides.com/en-us/guides/Introducing%20Microsoft%20Classroom#

How to get set up Microsoft Classroom

Teachers and pupils in Scottish schools have access to Microsoft Classroom using their Glow login details. Just log into Glow, choose any Office 365 tile then, from any part of Office 365, just click on the 9-square waffle and choose the Classroom tile. Alternatively go to Microsoft Classroom website and use your Glow login details to log in straight from there https://classroom.microsoft.com/

The video below is to the first in a playlist created by Microsoft Education of a series of short videos showing how to get started with Microsoft Classroom and how to undertake a variety of tasks a teacher may wish to do with their class.

Microsoft has an online support section for Microsoft Classroom – Getting Started with Microsoft Classroom – click on the links which best suit what you need for step by step guides.

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Getting-started-with-Microsoft-Classroom-dd5d064f-6c22-41e0-b721-9d359857d037

The Microsoft Educator Community has an introduction to Microsoft Classroom guiding users through the features, setup and management of Microsoft Classroom. Educators are encouraged to sign up on the Microsoft Educators Community as recognition is then given for completion of a course and assessment in the form of badge and certificate https://education.microsoft.com/GetTrained/introduction-to-microsoft-classroom

Miguel Guhlin has created a playlist of videos exploring different features of Microsoft Classroom and how different parts can be used in a classroom situation by a teacher with their class of learners. There’s videos showing the learner view, including on a tablet device, as well as examples showing how teachers might share different kinds of resources, how learners might complete tasks, and how a teacher might provide different forms of feedback.

Scott Letts has created some tutorial video guides to using Microsoft Classroom, How to set up Microsoft Classroom and Creating an assignment in Microsoft Classroom.

Mobile Device App

When setting up the app on a mobile device it will usually ask for the Office 365 for Education – that will be the full Glow email address.

How to make use of existing OneNote Class Notebooks in Microsoft Classroom

Schools which have already been using Microsoft OneNote and have existing OneNote Class Notebooks can associate Microsoft Classroom with existing Class Notebooks. To do this ensure you have the desktop version of OneNote installed on your computer, and have added the Class Notebook Add-in. Then to associate an existing Class Notebook with a Microsoft Classroom click on > Connections > Map Class Notebooks.

Is there a feature you’d like to see in Microsoft Classroom?

Microsoft Classroom has a user voice forum where users can feed back on features they’d like to see modified or added in future releases to better support the use of Microsoft Classroom by teachers and learners. Click on this link to see what others have requested and add your voice if there’s something which would make this even better for your classroom use.

https://edu.uservoice.com/forums/289447-general/category/165585-microsoft-classroom

A Further Discussion With John Swinney MSP⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Small - Further DFMJoin John Swinney in another Glow TV event to discuss ways to reduce teacher workload on Tuesday 13th September at 6.15pm. You will have the opportunity to ask questions live to Mr Swinney or submit a question prior to the event.

To follow up his recent Glow Meet, John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills, is offering an additional opportunity to education practitioners to discuss Curriculum for Excellence, the recently published Statement and Benchmarks, and other actions to help reduce teacher workload. He will be joined by Graeme Logan, Strategic Director, who was actively involved in developing the Statement and Benchmarks, and who is currently leading the Scottish Attainment Challenge for Education Scotland.

Once again, the questions will come from Scotland’s teachers and education practitioners. If you can’t take part on Tuesday, please send a question in advance to Jennifer.mckay@educationscotland.gsi.gov.uk. We will do our best to answer as many questions as we can during the Glow Meet and we will publish answers to any questions that we don’t manage to address.

Sign up now to take part live in Glow TV – A Further Discussion with John Swinney MSP

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

In focus: How ‘Insight’ supports DYW⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Insight assists secondary schools and local authorities in identifying where improvements can be made in the senior phase as well as areas of success and best practice. It supports professional dialogue about performance at whole school, curriculum area and subject level as part of the improvement process to raise attainment and improve post-school participation in employment, further and higher education. Insight went live in September 2014 but did you realise that discussions are ongoing with awards providers with a view to expanding the range of qualifications in Insight, including, most importantly, those that support vocational learning. Qualifications must be credit-rated on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework, and aligned with the principles of Curriculum for Excellence.

Insight already includes attainment data on a range of qualifications related to vocational education. These include National Certificates, Higher National Qualifications, Scottish Vocational Qualifications, National Progression Awards and Skills for Work qualifications. From September 2016 there will be additional useful updates:

  • some increases in the tariff points allocated to some specific work-related courses. Some courses attract ‘added value’ – i.e., where there is deemed to be value to the learner over and above the sum of the award’s constituent components – which might be units or courses.   This might be either because they contain an exam unit, an identified ‘added value unit’ (e.g. National 4) or because the award provider has made a case to the Insight project board that the course delivers added value in another way.
  • ‘added value’ recognition will be extended to National Certificates; National Progression Awards; and Scottish Vocational Qualifications. Skills for Work already had this recognition.  Of course, it is vital that choices about courses are made in the best interests of the individual learner, and not on the basis of tariff points, but the adjustments here will support effective self-evaluation by schools of their pupil cohorts’ outcomes
  • remember, Insight captures detail of awards gained by learners at establishments other than their base centre and these are included within the tariff-based benchmarking measures.  From September a new ‘partnership attainment’ measure to make data on the learning achieved by young people in colleges or other training providers, as part of a senior phase vocational pathway, will be more visible and convenient for users to access.

There is more;

  • the new Foundation Apprenticeships will also be awarded added-value from the first certifications in summer 2018.  As Foundation Apprenticeships will vary in SCQF credit points, the Insight tariff points for any particular framework will also vary depend on its characteristics. (Again, remember that course choices must of course be made in the best interests of the individual learner.)
  • a full review of the tariff principles (building on the annual health-checks)  is underway, now that Curriculum for Excellence and the new National Qualifications are fully implemented.  The review will consider whether any adjustments may be necessary to the tariff scale within Insight going forward, to ensure it is fulfilling its purpose as a benchmarking and self-evaluation tool. Keep your eyes open, we want to encourage as many responses as possible .

If you have any further question or wish to join the debate on Insight, please get in touch with Julie Anderson, Senior Phase Pathways & College Partnerships, DYW at the Scottish Government Learning Directorate.

What Could I Be? … in Food Production⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Food & Drink Federation and SRUC have developed this great poster outlining the breadth of career opportunities and chain of jobs involved in food production at Castelton Farm.

SFDF castelton farm poster

Looking for activities or discussion points with pupils?

Research what you could earn from doing the jobs identified on the poster.

Think of your favourite food. Can you create a career map demonstrating who is involved in creating your favourite food?

What food production is happening in your local area? Can you develop a food provenance map for your area and share on GLOW?

How does this link to the career standards?

Page 15 – 17 of  DYW Career Standards identifies the ‘I can’ statements for each level.

 

 

 

 

Feedback and more with Forms⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

FormsGathering feedback, taking quizzes to reinforce learning, undertaking surveys of views, signing up or registering for an activity – just some of the ways forms can be used by schools. And now there is the option to use Microsoft Forms – available as a free online tool which uses a Microsoft Office 365 account (available to all Glow users) to set up the form either by going to https://forms.office.com or, if already logged into Office 365, via the Forms tile in the office 365 navigation tiles waffle.  Office Forms can be created by either learners or educators.

Forms work nicely on any smartphones, tablets or PCs. Setting up requires the creator to be logged in to Office 365 but those completing the created form can be completed by anyone without requiring any kind of logging in (if that setting is chosen by the form creator), or they can be anonymous (if that is the setting the creator of the form wishes to use), or if they wish to restrict responses to their class and to ensure their identity they can use the login details of office 365 users too (if that’s how the creator of the form wishes the form to be completed). So the form creator gets the choice to suit the purpose and audience of their form.

Feedback is immediate, real-time, to the form creator and the results can be displayed in different ways to suit the need of the form creator.

For Sway users you can embed a form created with office Forms live in a Sway presentation information can be shared about a topic being studied and a quiz included alongside the content.

Creating your form

  1. Office365waffleEither go to https://forms.office.com and log in with your Office 365 account (for Scottish schools that will be your Glow account) or, if already logged into Office 365, choose the Forms tile in the office 365 navigation tiles waffle.
  2. Click on + New to start creating your new form (you can click on the title of any previously created form in order to edit that, and if you wish to base a new form on an existing form you can click on the … ellipsis to the right of the form title and choose copy – then you can edit the copy to create a new version.
  3. addformJust click on “Untitled form” to edit the name of your form, and click on “Enter a description” to add explanatory text as you may wish to include to explain the purpose of the form and perhaps mentioning the intended audience. Then click “+ Add question
  4. questiontypesChoose the type of question.There are five types of answer formats:
    • multiple choice questions (where you can choose to accept only one answer or multiple responses)
    • free-text (and you can choose either short or long text)
    • ratings (you can choose number or star rating)
    • quiz-questions (where you can provide immediate feedback to anyone filling in the form as to whether the respondent gave the correct answer or not (click on the tick icon to indicate which answer would be the correct answer – and just click on the speech-bubble icon to add comments to any response choice, which may give encouraging comments or suggestions for what to do next in response to the answer given, or any kind of feedback you wish to display when a particular choice is chosen)
    • date-input
  5. You can choose whether there can be multiple responses or only one answer accepted, you can require that specific questions have to be answered before a user can complete the form, and by clicking on the  …ellipsis you can choose whether a subtitle (which could provide explanatory text for each question) is displayed, and whether you wish to shuffle the order of questions so that each time someone sees the form the questions are displayed in a random order.
  6. Add as many further questions as you wish. You can re-order the questions by clicking on the upward or downward facing arrows above each question, and you can copy an existing question (and edit that copy), or delete an existing question.

Previewing your form

mobilepreviewformTo see what the form will look like for people about to fill it in you can click on “preview” at the top navigation bar. You can see how the questions will be laid out on a computer, and you can also choose to see how it will look on a mobile device.

Sharing your form

Once the form is complete click on “Send form” – this will open a side panel with various choices. It will provide a link to share with those you wish to respond to the form. It will create a QR code for quick scanning by users using a mobile device, and it will provide html embed code if you wish to embed the form within a website page or blogpost. This screen also gives you the option to choose who will be able to fill out the form – you can choose only people within your organisation (for Scottish schools using Glow that would be Glow users only), and within that you can choose whether or not to record the names of those responding in the results, or you can choose to make the form available to anyone with the link (where no sign-in will be required for people responding to the form).

If you click on “See all settings” at the foot of this side panel you will get further choices:

Looking at the results of your form

Responsesscreen

When you wish to look at the responses to a form you have shared then simply open the form and click on the responses tab along the top of the screen. You will get an overview of the number of respondents, the average time taken to complete by respondents, and whether the form is still active or expired 9if you’d set it to have a deadline). There is also the option to download to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (which comes complete with auto-filter drop-downs to easily sort the information generated to suit your needs).

Example forms

FormLearningHow did you get on with your learning this week? – this form is a mock form just to show how a form might be used for a teacher to get feedback from learners in their class to better support them. This example is based on the form created by Fiona Johnson, headteacher at Kilmartin Primary School in Argyll and Bute, but this link is purely an example so anyone can try it. Similarly here is another mock form (also based on the form created by Fiona Johnson as headteacher at Kilmartin Primary School in Argyll and Bute) – “How did you get on with your learning today?” – feel free to give it a try.

So what have people said about Office Forms?

StevenPayneFormsSteven Payne, an educator in Western Australia, shared the results of a mock use Microsoft Forms – showing the results, and the way in which they can be displayed, which the creator of the form can see once respondents have completed the survey.

Jim Federico commented in a tweet that Microsoft Forms being built into Office 365 for Education means no add-ins are required, and includes question types which auto-grade.

TestingWithOfficeFormsKurt Söser, an educator in Austria, has provided a step-by-step guide to his experience setting up a quiz with Microsoft Forms and using it with his learners.

VicentGadeaFormsVicent Gadea, an educator in Spain, described co-assessment using Microsoft Forms “1st time was complicated then was very powerful for us.”

Zelfstudforms

Koen Timmers, an educator in Belgium, has described in a step-by-step guide, illustrated with screenshots, how to set up a form using Office Forms, and shared what the responses look like for a form he created.

Making use of Forms in the classroom

There is a range of online form tools available, each of which can generally be used in similar ways, so it can be helpful to look at how others have used these tools when thinking about how online forms can support classroom activity.

DavidAndradeFormsChad Raid wrote about the use of forms on David Andrade’s Educational Technology Guy blog – some of which may be applicable in different educational scenarios. Obviously in any use of forms the issue of data security is paramount and guidance from school or local education  authority as to what can, and what must not, be requested via a form would clearly be essential.

 

The Zone of Relevance…explained.⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

On a Friday afternoon I often share teaching resources on Twitter, like many other teachers do, using the hashtag #PedagooFriday. The Zone of Relevance resource generated a lot of interest. I was contacted by teachers asking for further explanation and asking questions, which is understandable as 140 characters can be very limited! The Zone of […]

The Thinking Classroom. Don’t Call it Challenge!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

“Is History hard sir?” Year 8 student asking about options “Only if you aren’t good at it” replies the teacher Challenge and high expectations. That’s what you would expect to see in an evaluation of a lesson which was highly effective. They are words which indicate that students were “stretched” and that their learning was […]