Tag Archives: animation

Wick⤴

from @ wwwd – John's World Wide Wall Display

Last week I posted about the end of Flash, one of the thing I regretted was the loss of a tool to teach animation.
This week I noticed Wick: The Internet’s Free and Open-Source Creation Toolkit. This  works best with Firefox and Chrome. It make javascript animations that can be exported as a webpage. I’ve put one in the iFrame below.

Direct link: jj-test-wick

It looks like you can do a lot of cleave stuff with JavaSCript, but the editor supports the use of motion tweens and clips that can have their own timelines and tweens.

My skills in this department are limited, but if you look closely you will see the person in the animation is moving his arms and legs. They are a clip.

The flash vacuum is being filled before it exists.

Making Memes and Animated Gifs for Learning⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

memeanimatedlearningMemes and animated gifs abound in social media. You don’t have to look too long online to see these appear, often being shared and shared by many people via their social media accounts, or prominent on webpages or blogposts to draw in the reader to find out more about a story or data.

Having learners create their own memes or animated gifs can support their learning across all areas of the curriculum. The process of demonstrating understanding of a concept involves learners in reflecting on their learning, often discussing with others to test the depth of that understanding, and then finding creative ways to present the information to others. Where learners are encouraged to make these animated gifs or memes to demonstrate their understanding of concepts they are reflecting on what the key points are, they are summarising, in effect creating a visual précis of information.

So what is an animated gif?

Animated gifs are short animations lasting just a few seconds, sometimes just a sequence of related images, sometimes a short looping segment or clip of a video, sometimes a stop-motion style of inanimate objects brought to life to convey a message.

horsingaroundmemeAnd what is an image meme?

Image Memes generally may consist of a single photograph with text along the top and foot of the image, sometimes black top and bottom borders where bold white text is superimposed. The text is often in capitalised Impact font.

The text is usually very short and the text along the top can often be the draw to bring in the viewer, and then the text along the foot can spin the idea to make the reader reflect on the issue, often with humorous effect.

Where learners might make memes  and animated gifs

Animated gifs and memes present messages in a visual, attention-grabbing way, to make those who view them stop and think. The most thought-provoking memes and animated gifs distil what can be a complex concept into the main idea which can be understood in just a few seconds.

problem-shared-is-problem-halvedA Mental Health and Wellbeing project, AyeMind, (which inspired this blogpost after a presentation by Dr Trevor Lakey, Health Improvement and Inequalities manager with NHSGGC) developed by the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde along with partner organisations, has a fantastic website to be a part of providing positive mental health support for children and young people.

Part of this was about digital inclusion, and using the tools, platforms and means of communications familiar to children and young people to engage and share. Part of this project was enabling talking about mental health issues in a positive, supportive environment and giving the children and young people a voice and opportunity to make better use of the Internet, social media and mobile technologies. The memes and animated gifs on the AyeMind project website were created by children and young people as part of the project.

How to create an animated gif

There are a number of free online tools which let users create an animated gif. When using in an educational setting it would be prudent to check for suitability of advertising or galleries of user-created content which is rarely moderated.

Aye_Mind_ChooseaQuestionIdeally find a tool which just offers the tool for creation of the animated gif. Each tool which creates an animated gif may provide different options such as the limit on the number of images which can be uploaded, the option to control the speed or frame-rate of the animation, the size of the output animated gif image, and sometimes further options. Some simply provide the option for users to specify the location of an already uploaded video online, and the starting and finishing point for the clip animated gif to be created.

The Young Scot website AyeMind project page provides an excellent outline of an activity for involving children and young people in deciding on the message they wish to convey and then shows step-by-step how to use either an online tool or a mobile app to create an animated gif. There are also plenty of example of memes and animated gifs created by children and young people on the Young Scot website AyeMind project page and an outline guide providing the steps to running a session with children, young people or adults on coming up with the ideas and then moving to making the memes or animated gifs.

Online tools or mobile apps for creating an animated gif:

ABCyaABC.ya animator – aimed at being suitable for young children since it only permits drawn images or selection of pictures from an inbuilt galley of images.

GifMaker.me – animated gif creator with several options from which to choose in controlling how the animated gif will be presented, and provides the option to add music or even combine several animated gifs. As with any creation tool it provides the opportunity to explore sources of images and content found elsewhere, to use only where permission is granted and attribution given as required.

MakeAGif – provides the option to make a gif from an uploaded existing video or from an online source on YouTube, from which the specific segment can be selected. Be aware of the gallery of examples which would not all be appropriate for an educational setting.

EZGif – provides the option for animated gifs from multiple images (up to 400) or from video. There is advertising on the site but no gallery of user-created content.

Mobile device apps – many apps are available for smartphone or tablet to create animated gifs. Leslie Walker put together “Mobile GIF Guide: Make Animated GIFs on Your Phone” which lists several apps for mobile phones or tablet devices, along with descriptions of the features of each. Justin Pot gathered together “Making an animated gif is easier than you think with these  which lists online tools as well as mobile device apps, including descriptions and guidance as to how to make use of each. Elise Moreau collated a list of free animated gif creators for mobile devices at “9 Free GIF Maker Apps for iPhone and Android” describing each and providing helpful hints as to how each can be used.

Online tools or mobile device apps for creating an image meme

Any image-creation tool (or a presentation tool like PowerPoint) on computer, mobile or tablet device can usually be used for creating an image meme – wherever an image can be placed with the facility to overlay text either along the top and bottom of the image, or within a border of black along the top and bottom of the image for white text to be superimposed on these black panels. There are online tools but as with any free online tool a having unmoderated galleries of user-created content has to be a factor an educator looks at in assessing the suitability of a tool in an educational context, however the following may provide the teacher with ideas, guides as well as inspire an adaptation of an existing meme to suit the learning need. Meme creation online tools include imgFlip Meme generator, MemeMaker.Net, MemeGenerator.net, and ImageChef Meme Maker (be aware that all of these have galleries of user-generated content which would not generally be suitable in an educational context but selected memes may be shared by a teacher for showing examples).

Mobile device apps specifically for creating image memes have been collated on the AppCrawlr site “Best iOS apps for meme generator” and “Best Android apps for meme generator.” Mobile device users may well find they already have one of these apps as several have multiple purposes such as for editing images.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Reflections from the #IntelVisionaries Launch Event, October 2015: 6 of 17 – Transmedia⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

IntelVisionaries Banner

This is part of a short series of posts where I reflect on the inaugural Intel Education Visionaries meet up in Santa Clara, California in October 2015.

 ________________________________________________________  

I really enjoyed Dr Wayne Grant's Presentation on Transmedia Education. Much of the presentation was covered under NDA so I can’t share some of the things that we saw here but I am able to cover some of the more general points.

Firstly, if you unfamiliar with Transmedia Education then you might find this definition from Wikipedia helpful?

“Transmedia Storytelling (also known as transmedia narrative or multiplatform storytelling, cross-media seriality) is the technique of telling a single story or story experience across multiple platforms and formats including, but not limited to, games, books, events, cinema and television.“

I liked this this short animation that was shown at the start of the presentation that shows quite nicely the sorts of things that are now possible within the domain of real-life and digital story telling in a rapidly interconnected world.

 

Wayne was all about engagement (and why wouldn’t he be!) and I liked the model he shared on the stages of student engagement from rebellion through compliance to true (and deep) engagement.

Levels-of-Student-Engagement

I hadn’t really though about stages of engagement linked to student classroom behaviours before and I can see how I might use this as we continue to develop and build on our already successful our self-evaluation procedures at the school.

Wayne also talked about some emerging transmedia elements on the horizon and encouraged us to think about the power of custom software and custom hardware and how much more effective they can be if they are combined. 

To illustrate this we took a sneak preview of a number of quite interesting kickstarter projects such as:

 

 

Linkitz Kickstarter video May 2015 from linkitz on Vimeo.

 

We also looked at some more established products in the context of transmedia education such as:

 

 

 

 

Finally, he also mentioned Project MC2 (a Netflix commissioned original series).

 

Products like Project MC2  are exciting for me as they have very high production values but the learning behind them is also very sound. Kind of reminds me of lots of the work we used to do around commercial off the shelf (COTS) games at the Consolarium. I’ll be checking out MCas soon as I get a chance because the short piece that I saw was very impressive – I also heard that it has been recommissioned for a second season?

With Intel’s acquisition of Kno (now Intel Education Study) in recent times hopefully we will start to see more Transmedia elements built into their software stack?

BTW – if you like the idea of Transmedia Education then do check out Inanimate Alice which is just a first class super product.

Pixar: The maths behind the movies [@TedTalks]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

The folks at Pixar are widely known as some of the world's best storytellers and animators. They are perhaps less recognized as some of the most innovative math whizzes around. I loved this TED Talk by Pixar Research Lead Tony DeRose which delves into the math behind the animations, explaining how arithmetic, trigonometry and geometry help bring Sheriff Woody and the rest of your favorite characters to life.

Just a shame computer animation doesn't appear in the SQA Lifeskills Maths Course!

Whats you favorite Maths video (under ten minutes) that is guaranteed to get kids excited about Maths?

NASA Space Sounds free to use on SoundCloud [@nasa @soundcloud]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Apollo Soundcloud

Following yesterdays post on the Open Content Toolkit I discovered that NASA has posted a massive library of ‘Space Sounds’ on SoundCloud. You are free to use all of these sounds as you wish, because NASA’s own audio isn’t copyrighted. It is meant to be a public service to the American people of their taxpayer-funded government program, but this ‘fair-use’ extends to everyone globally. They do ask you to list NASA as source, but that’s only reasonable. Read their content guidelines for full details. 

My favourite are the Apollo Sounds which include the classics ‘Eagle Has Landed, ‘Houston, We've Had a Problem and ‘We Have a Lift-Off’. But here are lots of other great sounds as well including rocket sounds, the chirps of satellites and equipment, lightning on Jupiter and interstellar plasma.

In short a great resource library for anyone interested in space, sound and film editing.

Oh, if you like Space Sounds this TED Talk (from 2011) by Artist-technologist Honor Harger is worth a watch (and a listen) as well...

 

Beautiful Collaborative Animation – The life cycle of a droplet of water [VIDEO]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Watrer Droplets

This is a lovely paper pop-up animation that shows the life cycle of a droplet of water. As well as being beautiful in its own right it is also interesting to note that the creators of the video publically state that it is a collaborative piece which utilizes the individual skill sets of three different people.

 

It’s a good illustration that in the 3rd Millennium the ability to be able to collaborate on creative and enterprising projects is an important skill.

Although we talk a lot about collaboration in schools and in education we are still not really very good at creating (and allowing) real collaborative learning opportunities for young people. This is something that we simply must improve and get better at.

Not only are collaborative activities (beyond group work) important for the social development of children but being able to work collaboratively in a creative and enterprising way is also vital to build future economies.

There is also another important lesson that this great little video can teach educators. As well a producing the video the authors have also produced an equally as fascinating video that shows ‘the making of’ the film.

 

This type of work is important because it captures the learning within the process of producing the final product. In education we spend far too much time rewarding the final outcome rather than rewarding the process (and that’s the bit where all the learning occurs). 

Powtoon Presentation tool for animating your message⤴

from @ ICT for Teaching & Learning in Falkirk Primary Schools

Powtoon is a free online animated presentation tool with a host of features for bringing alive whatever message schools may wish to share with their school community or wider audiences. So whether promoting aspects of the life of a school, explaining processes or sharing learning and teaching activity of a class then Powtoon can provide an option to create engaging presentations.

There is an inbuilt bank of graphics, all of which can have a variety of animations applied, and sequenced and re-sequenced to best illustrate any message. The free account lets users create and save a good number of different presentations and upload any completed presentations directly to YouTube (paid premium versions have the option to download completed presentations as videos). The free version accounts with Powtoon (with options for a free education-specific account) restrict the length of the finished presentations/videos and include the Powtoon message logo and watermark (which would not be included in the premium versions).

In addition to the free to use graphics there is also the facility to add from a choice of free-to-use music tracks which will match the length of your completed presentation/video. And of course you can add voice narration to the presentation.

Click here to watch a promotional video for Powtoon

Click here for an example of the use of Powtoon (created by Stuart Lennie of Falkirk Council Education Services), in this case to explain the options for Safe Searching in YouTube for schools
 
Click here to watch a presentation by a teacher using Powtoon to explain a task to pupils (Mrs Frank at Saint Agnes Academy-Saint Dominic School):

Sparkol Videoscribe – if you are looking for even more than Powtoon provides, then you may wish to have a look at Sparkol Videoscribe. This commercial product adds a number of features to those which Powtoon provides, one of which is that the animated drawing hand can show the building up of any image so the viewer of the finished presentation sees the chosen object being drawn in front of their eyes.

Click here for an example video by Preston Lodge High School, East Lothian of the kind of presentation video which would be possible to create in this style:

Gabriel Guzman has produced a video explaining Bloom's Taxonomy using VideoScribe

Wideo is a free online tool for creating animated videos with a range of inbuilt graphics and animations. There is a range of examples of uses in education provided by many users. There are inbuilt video tutorials showing the ease with which animated videos with voiceover can be created.