Tag Archives: Adult Learning

Gaelic Language Enrichment Course for teachers of Gaelic Learner and Medium Education (GLE and GME)⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

When: 2 – 7 July 2017 and 23 – 27 July 2017

Where: South Uist

Fee: £250

Language level: Beginner to Fluent

Brief: This Gaelic Enrichment Course is a career-long professional learning opportunity for teachers of GLE and GME. The course aims to support teachers use and develop their Gaelic language skills within a community setting. The course will be tailored to the specific needs of the teachers.  It includes: conversational skills, grammar, resources for the classroom, workshops and field trips.

For more information, please contact: Ceòlas Uibhist, Taigh Gleus, Dalabrog, Uibhist a Deas HS8 5SS Tel: 01878 700154 E-mail: info@ceolas.co.uk

www.ceolas .co.uk

Developing Gaelic literacy skills⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Tuesday 7th February, Balnain House, Inverness; 09.15  – 17.00 Tutor: Roddy MacLean

Are you interested in developing your skills in editing and proof-reading Gaelic texts?  If so, this professional learning opportunity may be of interest to you.  It includes a focus on grammar and writing conventions.  For more information, or to register for the course, email John Storey, at the Gaelic Books Council.

Sgilean Sgrìobhaidh is Deasachaidh Gàidhlig airson nan Gnìomhachasan Cruthachail

Dimàirt 7 an Gearran, Balnain House, Inbhir Nis. 09.15 – 17.00 Neach-teagaisg: Ruairidh MacIlleathain

A bheil ùidh agad ann an obair-deasachaidh ceangailte ri leabhraichean no foillseachaidhean eile?  Ma tha, ‘s dòcha gum bi ùidh agad anns a’ chùrsa ùr seo.  Airson tuilleadh fiosrachaidh, no airson clàradh, cuiribh brath gu John Storey, Ceannard Litreachais agus Foillseachaidh.

Are you all right? – Reflections on a visit to Polmont⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Through the Scottish Attainment  Challenge, the profile of poverty and the implications for attainment and outcomes  for children and young people has never been more to the forefront of discussion and policy.

As part of the Challenge, I have a role in looking at poverty and its resulting complexities from an academic viewpoint and in researching some recent articles.

I recently had the privilege of visiting Polmont Young Offenders Institute with  a group of colleagues to hear and see at first- hand some of the initiatives to increase life chances and improve opportunities in this context. I left the experience with great admiration for the  direction of travel not only to help prevent re- offending but more importantly, the clarity around understanding the stats and stories behind the young people being there in the first place.

These stats had a profound impact on my conscience and strengthened my resolve to share information about prevention rather than cure…..

A fundamental life experience touched almost all of the young people and that was an experience of bereavement, often a close family member. A high number of young folk had multiple losses, one as many as 17 in their life story. Another common feature, was school exclusion and interestingly, most did not dislike school when they were attending but did resort to ‘class clown’ behaviours. This clown image was evident in a striking piece of artwork on the wall of the performance arts studio in Polmont.

Speaking to some of the young people it was clear that common experiences and regret for poor choices was evident but in spite of these difficulties, there was hope for a better future and those who choose to gain skills and qualifications were hopeful these would help them once liberated. After the young people leave is a whole different blog post!

As a result of the visit, I developed this Sway presentation

I hope you find some of the content interesting and thought provoking and would ask you to consider these points.

  • How often do you encounter the ‘class clown’ ?
  • How often do you find the time and space to ask “Are you alright?”
  • What support would make a difference?  
  • What options do youngsters at risk in your care have and how are these made known to them?

This Sway may be useful as part of a professional learning session in your school. If you want to take part in a secure, online discussion of the questions, we are talking about them on the Scottish Attainment Challenge community on Glow

If you need your Glow password reset, see How do I get a Glow login?


 

Can we learn from Making Ireland Click – Literacy series⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Making Ireland Click is a campaigning four-part series, guided by Ireland’s Digital Champion, David Puttnam.  on the skills  Irish citizens need  to be  digitally literate. Over four half hour episodes, the series deals with digital inclusion and showcases work around skills needed  to go online.

There are a range of useful adult learner resources, including videos on online banking and social media tips, available on the shows.
To learn more about Making Ireland Click see here

What keeps you sharp? Over 40 this is for you⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

what-keeps-you-sharp

What Keeps You Sharp? survey launched

People often think of changes in their thinking skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not.

What Keeps You Sharp? is a nationwide survey being led by researchers at Heriot-Watt University about your beliefs and attitudes to how thinking skills might change with age. They  also want to know if you think there are things we can do to maintain or improve thinking skills as we grow older.

If you’re aged 40 or over and living in the UK you can complete the survey online: http://tinyurl.com/keepingsharp.

 Help  spread the word

They  want to reach as broad an audience as possible, so share within your own networks – email lists, Facebook and other social media.

Anyone on social media can share the links  from @TheAgeingLab and the hashtag #WhatKeepsYouSharp?

Please share the survey among your friends and family and any groups you might be associated with.

Supporting Men’s Sheds⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

scottish-mens-sheds-association-logo-WT-smallCan you help your local Men’s Shed?

In Argyll and Bute  when a school was  updating technical equipment they  gifted it to their local Men’s shed.  It’s a recycle/ re-use story.  Actions like this   promote inter-generational activities and lifelong learning.

A men’s shed is a meeting place where men come together and take part in a variety of mutually agreed activities. There are Men’s Sheds in 22 regions – there could be one near you.  More information from Age Scotland  or Scottish Men’s Sheds website

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Supporting Men’s Sheds⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

scottish-mens-sheds-association-logo-WT-smallCan you help your local Men’s Shed?

In Argyll and Bute  when a school was  updating technical equipment they  gifted it to their local Men’s shed.  It’s a recycle/ re-use story.  Actions like this   promote inter-generational activities and lifelong learning.

A men’s shed is a meeting place where men come together and take part in a variety of mutually agreed activities. There are Men’s Sheds in 22 regions – there could be one near you.  More information from Age Scotland  or Scottish Men’s Sheds website

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National Coding Week 19th September 2016⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

NCW-Banner-BlueText-Scottish

How to get involved with National Coding Week

Children are part of a confident “Digital Generation” having grown up with the internet, smart phones and coding classes. However, many adults have missed out on the digital revolution and feel left behind.

“The aim of National Coding Week is to give adults the opportunity to learn some digital skills”.

Children can inspire adults

Children are learning digital skills in school or through coding clubs such as CoderDojos. We therefore would like these clubs to open their doors to parents for a one-off session in which the children will teach the adults some of the skills they have learnt.

Libraries can act as focal points

Libraries are in an ideal position to act as a focal point and can host a coding session. Either the staff can lead the session or someone who is confident and familiar with coding from the local community can share their skills. Read CILIP’s blog: Libraries — how they can improve our Digital Literacy

Schools can get involved

Children are learning coding but many parents don’t understand what their children are doing and many non-specialist teachers and governors feel they have missed out on these skills.

Web, app, creative and digital businesses can throw open their doors

Those with the expertise can share their skills and have fun teaching people the basics of coding. There are many training organisations who offer courses throughout the year. They can contribute to the week by offering taster sessions to encourage people to sign-up.

Tech Hubs

There are hundreds of tech hubs with amazing businesses working from them. The tech hubs are giving start-ups a platform from which to launch businesses and inspire others. These can be the perfect venue for the week and we would love them to be involved.

Advice:

1) Keep it simple — it might simply by showing people resources available on the Technologies Professional Learning Community  in Glow, Code.org or Barefoot Computing

2) If you are able to organise it, get a friendly local web development agency, ICT teacher or FE college tutor to lead the session.

Click here to get involved!

Young People’s Social and Political Participation Across the EU⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

 LSE pilot study ends 3rd July
CATCH-EyoU (Constructing Active Citizenship with European Youth: Policies, Practices, Challenges and Solutions) is a research and innovation action funded by the European Commission
CATCH-EyoU is trying to find out about young people’s social and political participation across the EU and want to understand why and how some young people decide to participate (or to not participate) in their communities, in politics, and in social life. They are especially interested in European active citizenship and what this might mean to young people.
The project is currently carrying out a survey which seeks the views of young people, in two separate age groups: between 16-18, and between 19–25 on their experiences and perspectives as young European citizens. The pilot survey will be open until 3 July.
For young people between the ages of 16-18 the link to the survey is here.
For young people between the ages of 19-25 the link to the survey is here.
Any young person completing the whole survey will be eligible to win one of ten £20 Amazon voucher prizes. These will be randomly allocated at the beginning of July, and will be sent via email to the winning participant.
Find out more here.
Contact: Dr Sam Mejias at London School of Economic and Political Science, s.mejias@lse.ac.uk

Learning Families – Intergenerational Approaches to Literacy Teaching and Learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

“All of the programmes featured in this publication by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning  share valuable experiences and lessons. They reflect a view of effective learning families whereby each child is a member of a family, and within a learning family every member is a lifelong learner. Among disadvantaged families and communities in particular, a family literacy and learning approach is more likely to break the intergenerational cycle of low education and literacy skills..” (Elfert and Hanermann 2014)

http://uil.unesco.org/fileadmin/keydocuments/Literacy/en/learning-families.pdf