Tag Archives: Additional Support for Learning

Equality & Inclusion: Good practice exemplars⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following four good practice exemplars have been published on the National Improvement Hub to highlight initiatives that help learners requiring additional support to develop skills and find employment.

Exemplar 1: Enable Scotland’s ‘Stepping Up’ programme

This innovative employability programme offers comprehensive support for young people aged 14 to 19 who have learning disabilities which takes participants from an initial investigation of the world of work, through a process of discovery and planning for their future, to engagement with employers in real workplace settings. Find out more here.

Exemplar 2: ‘Thinking Digitally’ – a new resource

This credit rate module by Lead Scotland allows candidates to develop relevant digital skills and build confidence operating in online environments.  More on this here.

Exemplar 3:  ‘TOPs’ – training opportunities for young parents

This programme run by Rathbone Training, a UK-wide voluntary youth sector organisation which supports young people aged 16 to 24 who have disengaged from society, aims to help young parents in their personal development. More here.

Exemplar 4: ‘Community Action and Leadership Award

This is a course created by the charity Lead Scotland so that more people can learn how to influence change and make a difference within their communities. More information here.

A different perspective⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Cat Thomson, Senior Development Officer, Enquire

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are aged between 12 and 18 and represent 22 of the 32 local authorities in Scotland. The group aims to:

  • Share young people’s views and experiences of inclusion;
  • Raise awareness of Additional Support for Learning with other pupils to reduce stigma and improve understanding;
  • Improve school staffs understanding of inclusion;
  • Work together to develop ways to develop and support inclusive education.

They are supported by Education Scotland, Enquire [the Scottish advice service for additional support for learning] and individual local authority staff.

In June, the young people took their messages about inclusion to the Scottish Cabinet.

“We want to be seen as individuals with our own set of unique strengths and skills.”

These are impressive words from Alistair, one of the Young Ambassadors for Inclusion who met Deputy First Minister and Education Secretary, John Swinney in June to share their views on inclusion and support in school.

During the meeting, 11 members of the group shared findings from their work. They were keen to raise issues they think it is important for policymakers, local authority staff, school leaders, teachers and support staff to hear and reflect on when making decisions about support for pupils with additional support for learning.

One of the first questions the Ambassadors considered was what inclusion means to them. Their comments make for interesting reading. Many of the young people saw inclusion as a positive thing making pupils feeling safe, accepted, and treated equally. Common messages were “everybody [should be] included in education regardless of need”, “being able to work together with a range of people”, “everybody involved, nobody left out” and “not being defined by any difficulties you have”.

A small number of Ambassadors talked about inclusion adding additional pressure to young people but the universal message was how incredibly important it is to young people to feel listened to, understood and supported. Comments included: “It’s good when we are listened to and asked what we need”, and “When staff have an understanding of different additional support needs and can understand certain behaviour it helps them understand why young people may act in a particular way.”

What works less well is when pupils feel excluded or unsupported: “Many class teachers and other staff do not have awareness of additional support needs, what that means for us and how to support in the classroom”, and “Pupils need access to all areas of the school and curriculum.”

A number of pupils wanted to encourage schools to give pupils with additional support needs the same opportunities as other pupils and not to make assumptions about their abilities, highlighting that sometimes trying something and not succeeding is better than not trying.

Key themes

Some of the themes they identified from their work included: raising awareness, friendship and belonging, positive attitude and support.

Raising Awareness

“Whole school awareness of ASN can support much better understanding and reduce stigma and isolation”

“Taking opportunities to share that people are different and you should not make fun of them.”

Ambassadors recommended that all teachers should have training on inclusion and the different types of additional support for learning pupils may have and how this might affect them in school.

They felt more could be done in primary school to raise awareness of additional support for learning and called for zero tolerance of bullying of pupils with additional support needs.

They suggested holding pupil conferences, taking part in national awareness weeks, putting on school assemblies led by pupils, or developing awareness raising days about specific issues such as mental health or LGBT.

Friendship and belonging

“I didn’t really feel part of mainstream school.”

Ambassadors called for schools to help young people feel more confident, build friendships and feel included. Schools should provide opportunities to take part in activities with peers.

Positive Attitudes

“Don’t segregate pupils with needs.”

“It helps to be patient.”

As one Inclusion Ambassador said to John Swinney: “We need to create positive stories about pupils with additional support need rather than focus on the negatives.”

Ambassadors felt schools should focus on raising awareness of the range of reasons a pupil may need support and how this might make a pupil feel in school, while also encouraging a more positive view of additional support needs.

“Supportive teachers in mainstream are crucial”

“Teachers need qualifications to work with pupils with additional support needs and medical needs.”

“Staff off and no replacement really affects learning”

Making it easy for pupils to ask for help and offer the right support

Sharing information about how pupils can ask for help and having supportive and empathetic teachers who can support pupil’s emotional issues was highlighted as helpful to encourage young people to ask for help when they need it.

Ambassadors stressed the importance of schools listening to pupils about the type of support they wanted in school. They also highlighted the impact of crucial support not being available to help them get the most out of school, with many reporting support had been reduced due to budget cuts. Others shared experiences of inconsistent staffing, and highlighted the impact this had on their learning and school experience.

Ambassadors encouraged schools to have a range of options for collected pupils views, including focus groups and questionnaires.

What next?

The Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are planning to create a pledge that schools can use to demonstrate their commitment to inclusion. They will also be involved in developing a support pack for schools, including a short film to raise awareness of inclusion, the range of additional support needs and the impact on pupils and their families.

This article also appears in August’s Children in Scotland magazine.

www.enquire.org.uk @ASLadvice

DYW Interesting Practice – Sanderson High School: Tailored learning pathways to meet the needs of all⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The whole school approach to DYW offers learners at Sanderson High School in South Lanarkshire a wide variety of career related and work-based learning opportunities that aims to inspire the exploration of future pathways.  The learning experiences within and beyond the curriculum not only provide learners with a significantly enhanced skills portfolio, tracked and referenced through profiling, but also ensure meaningful connections with the world of work and accreditation in the senior phase. As part of this approach the school created the subject ‘Education for Work’ which now forms part of the core curriculum at all levels. 

The school has also developed a Position Statement which states that “all young people will learn about the world of work; and where appropriate all young people will participate in suitable work experience; and all young people will have a clearly defined and individualised pathway from S1-S6, resulting in sustainable, meaningful post-school destinations.”

Staff use the entitlements from Career Education Standard 3-18 (CES) to ensure these aims are put into practice and audit the skills the young people are developing. For example, staff in each subject area match their curriculum and teaching and learning approaches to the relevant entitlements from the CES and the appropriate skills . The school has a good range of work placements for young people in the senior phase, which provides them with an excellent experience of the world of work and which links well to the curriculum.

There is also a close partnership with Calderglen High School on the implementation of DYW with learners taking up  volunteering opportunities at Sanderson HS.   Video clip: Volunteering at Sanderson HS

Find out more about the schools DYW approach by accessing the Interesting Practice in Skills DYW – Sanderson High School summary information.

Learning Families – Intergenerational Approaches to Literacy Teaching and Learning⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

“All of the programmes featured in this publication by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning  share valuable experiences and lessons. They reflect a view of effective learning families whereby each child is a member of a family, and within a learning family every member is a lifelong learner. Among disadvantaged families and communities in particular, a family literacy and learning approach is more likely to break the intergenerational cycle of low education and literacy skills..” (Elfert and Hanermann 2014)

http://uil.unesco.org/fileadmin/keydocuments/Literacy/en/learning-families.pdf

Are you ready for the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014?⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

CYCJ_logoThe Centre for Youth and Criminal Justice could help 

The Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice (CYCJ) supports improvement for young people who offend, contributing to better lives for individuals and communities by…

Providing advice and support

Their multidisciplinary team provide support to those who need it, from advising on individual cases to service and organisational level development. 

Events and training

Events and training opportunities are a regular ‘free of charge’ fixture of the CYCJ calendar, and include topics like the Children and Young Person (Scotland) Act 2014 and how it will impact on you and your organisation. This includes the role of the Named Person, Child’s Plan and links to local services like EEI (Early and Effective Intervention).

IVY (Interventions for Vulnerable Youth)

The ground-breaking Interventions for Vulnerable Youth Project (IVY) is funded by the Scottish Government to meet the needs of high risk young people Find out more at www.cycj.org.uk/ivy

A guide to Youth Justice in Scotland: policy, practice and legislation

CYCJ produces guidance to youth justice in Scotland, incorporating the latest legislation and policy changes. Download the current sections at www.cycj.org.uk/youthpracticeguide.

To find out more…

CEITIDH – FIRST GAELIC COMPUTER VOICE⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Ceitidh Computer Voice

Ceitidh is now available from CALL Scotland’s Scottish voice website alongside “Heather” and “Stuart”, the two Scottish computer voices. Heather and Stuart are also licenced for the entire Scottish Public Sector.

The new Gaelic computer voice is licensed for the Scottish public sector, so it can be used by students in schools, colleges and universities, NHS patients, and employees in the public sector. CALL also has permission to distribute the voice to charities.

The Gaelic voice works on Windows and Macintosh computers and can be used to:

  • read Gaelic web sites, ebooks, textbooks, SQA exam papers and other curriculum resources;
  • check writing, emails, and social media posts – proofreading by listening can improve spelling and grammar;

The voice will be particularly helpful for Gaelic speakers with dyslexia, reading difficulties and visual impairment, but it should also be useful for anyone learning or working in Gaelic.

LEARNING IN CARE REFERENCE TOOL⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

LEARNING_IN_CARE
Click to open pdf

This document aims to support care staff working collaboratively with education staff to support children and young people with their learning in the care setting. It recognises that care staff are already supporting children and young people’s learning in care, and aims to provide them with practical examples which will assist services to further improve learning outcomes for children and young people across care and education. The examples of learning experiences which follow are organised in the 3 key curriculum areas which are the responsibility of all: literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing.

Click here to open the document as a pdf.

Click here to discuss this in the Inclusion Hub on GLOW.

Voice Assisted Technology for Gaelic⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The world’s first Scottish Gaelic Computer Voice is now available from CALL Scotland’s Scottish Voice web site. The new Gaelic computer voice is licensed for the whole of the Scottish public sector, so it can be used by students in schools, colleges and universities, NHS patients, and employees in the public sector.

Ceitidh is available from our Scottish voice website alongside “Heather” and “Stuart”, the two Scottish computer voices.

The Gaelic voice works on Windows and Macintosh computers and can be used to:

  • read Gaelic web sites, ebooks, textbooks, SQA exam papers and other curriculum resources;
  • check writing, emails, and social media posts – listening to what you have typed can help improve your spelling and grammar.

The voice will be particularly helpful for speakers of Gaelic with dyslexia, reading difficulties and visual impairment, but it should also be useful for anyone learning or working in Gaelic.

The development of the voice was funded by the Scottish Government, Scottish Funding Council, SQA and Bòrd na Gàidhlig. The voice has been created by CereProc, the world leading speech Synthesis Company in Edinburgh, working with Michael Bauer of Akerbeltz.

Read more at http://www.callscotland.org.uk/blog/filte-gu-ceitidh-a-chiad-guth-gidhlig-airson-coimpiutair/.

 

 

Fly The Flag For Human Rights⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

New campaign to promote the benefits of human rights. 

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The Scottish Government’s #FlyTheFlag for human rights campaign is part of a contribution to the objectives of Scotland’s National Action Plan for Human Rights, where evidence demonstrates that people are insufficiently aware of their rights and do not feel empowered to claim their rights.

New research carried out by You Gov has shown that one in five Scots believe that human rights are for minority groups only. This new campaign is designed to help people better understand how human rights are relevant, used on a day to day basis and how they help build a fairer and more progressive society.

Click here to read more.

Why not continue the conversation on Glow here.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – Free event for education professionals⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

FASD

Free Event for Education Professionals

10.00 – 15.00

17 November 2015

COSLA, Edinburgh, 19 Haymarket Yards, Edinburgh, EH12 5BH

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the leading known preventable cause of permanent learning disability worldwide and is caused by maternal use of alcohol during pregnancy. Affected children can have a wide range of physical, growth and neurobehavioural problems which impact on their everyday lives and limit their independence.  Often teachers are the first professional to notice a child has difficulties.

As part of a programme of events over the last 4 years, the Scottish Government has arranged a free event for nursery and primary school teachers. The event’s keynote speaker is Dr Ana Hanlon-Dearman – a Developmental Paediatrician from the Manitoba FASD Centre in Canada. The Scottish Government has worked closely with Dr Hanlon-Dearman in moving FASD forward in Scotland. Dr Hanlon-Dearman has a wealth of experience working with schools in Manitoba, and will be discussing their work supporting children and young people, as well as tools that have proved successful.

For further information or to book a space on the event, please contact Jamie.garden@gov.scot 0131 244 4634.