All England but worth reflecting on Skills Policy/ Politics in England⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


Thanks to https://unsplash.com/@heftiba for this image

Education and Skills is thankfully a devolved issue in Scotland and we have our own levers and our own challenges in making Education and Skills in Scotland reflect the needs of Scottish learners, employers and broader civil society. And thankfully education and training is still viewed in the main as a social good across the political spectrum in Scotland.

But it is worth having a keek over Hadrian's Wall as large UK employers will have an appetite or at least will question the Scottish institutional response to some of the broader English reforms around Further Education and Vocational Skills Reform.

Some of these policy commitments could have big implications for Scottish training providers operating in England and for FE Colleges in Scotland trying to hold on to training contracts from English based organisations.

In amongst all of this there are some good ideas, from both sides of this political divide. Some of these ideas might even creep north of the border but only the good ones,  I hope.

The summaries of Labour and Conservative Manifesto's as reported by The Federation of UK Awarding Bodies appear below along with links to the full party manifesto.

Labour Party Manifesto
  • Labour would introduce free, lifelong education in FE colleges, enabling everyone to upskill or retrain at any point in life.
  • Labour would abandon Conservative plans to once again reinvent the wheel by building new Technical Colleges, redirecting the money to increase teacher numbers in the FE sector.
  • To implement Sainsbury’s recommendations, we would correct historic neglect of the FE sector by giving the sector the investment – in teachers and facilities – it deserves to become a world-leading provider of adult and vocational education. 
  • Labour would restore the Education Maintenance Allowance for 16-18 year olds from lower and middle income backgrounds
  • Labour would replace Advanced Learner Loans and upfront course fees with direct funding, making FE courses free at the point of use.
In relation to apprenticeships, the draft manifesto includes commitment to:
  • Maintain the apprenticeship levy while taking measures to ensure high quality by requiring the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education to report on an annual basis to the Secretary of State on quality outcomes of completed apprenticeships to ensure they deliver skilled workers for employers and real jobs for apprentices at the end of their training 
  • Set a target to double the number of completed apprenticeships at NVQ level 3 by 2022
  • Cover apprentices’ travel costs, which currently run to an average of £24 a week – a quarter of earnings if apprentices are on the minimum wage. 
 
  •  Roll out of T Levels with an average of 900 teaching hours per year and a 3 month work placement. No specific mention of or timescales licences etc.
  • Repeated commitment to create 3 million apprenticeships for young people by 2020.
  • A UCAS-style portal for technical education
  • Commitment to establish skills as a key part of the "modern industrial strategy"
  • £250 million investment in skills by the end of 2020 from the National Productivity Investment Fund
  • Double the Immigration Skills Charge levied on companies employing migrant workers, to £2,000 a year by the end of the parliament.
  • Ensure that the skills and qualifications gained by members of the armed forces are recognised by civilian employers
  • New institutes of technology, backed by leading employers and linked to universities, in every major city in England. They will provide courses at degree level and above, specialising in technical disciplines, such as STEM, whilst also providing higher-level apprenticeships and bespoke courses for employers
  • Employers still "at the centre of these reforms" with Skills Advisory Panels and Local Enterprise Partnerships working at a regional and local level.
  • Discounted bus and train travel for apprentices
  • A new right to request leave for training for all employees.
  • A national retraining scheme - the costs of training will be met by the government, with companies able to gain access to the Apprenticeship Levy to support wage costs during the training period.
  •  A right to lifelong learning in digital skills.
 
 
 
 
 

 







 
 



 
 





 



 

Using evidence to improve outcomes in secondary⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Carol McDonald, HM Inspector and Lead Officer for secondary inspection

Time to reflect on inspection evidence is always an interesting and key part of our work. Reviewing our findings for the recent report ‘Quality and improvement in Scottish education 2012 – 2016’ (QuISE) highlighted some important strengths in the secondary sector over a period with significant changes to the curriculum.

Inspectors appreciate the opportunity inspection offers to engage in dialogue with staff, parents, partners of the school and the young people themselves.   We learn a great deal from our discussions which informs many aspects of our work.

You can read the secondary chapter from QuISE on our website.  In secondary schools, inspectors found the curriculum in most schools evolving as new qualifications replaced old ones. Much of the work in schools focused on implementing new qualifications and increasing the range of accreditation available to young people in the senior phase.

Staff in schools recognised that to continue to improve attainment, improvements to learning pathways from S1 to S3 are required. Young people are well supported by the good relationships they enjoy with their teachers. However, too much variability was observed in the quality of learning and teaching.  Schools need to continue to work to ensure staff share a good understanding of the best features of effective practice.

Our evidence shows that schools need to use the wide range of evidence available to ensure that school improvement planning is manageable and achievable. The evidence from Insight, and from teacher’s professional judgements on the progress of young people, needs better used to inform improvement planning.

Schools are working effectively with partners to develop the young workforce using a range of innovative approaches. Senior staff in schools are using the Career Education Standard 3-18 (CES), the Work Placement Standard (WPS) and Guidance on School/Employer Partnerships as a platform to promote and develop DYW in their schools.  The use of the standards and the guidance to align and co-ordinate activity is still at an early stage.  Teaching staff, young people and employers are not yet aware of the entitlements and the expectations within the standards and guidance.

Our inspections in the current academic year show improvements in arrangements for assessing and tracking the progress of young people across all aspects of their learning. Using this evidence to implement appropriate interventions for individuals is key to improving outcomes for young people.  Collating the evidence at a department, faculty and whole school level allows staff to analyse and act upon necessary improvements.   Central to this work is the reliability of the assessment evidence.  We are seeing teachers beginning to make good use of the benchmarks to support them in this essential work.

In the best examples, schools are identifying, and taking account of, a range of features which may influence outcomes for young people. This includes factors such as being “looked after” (LAC), living in areas of social deprivation (SIMD 1 and 2) and having identified additional support requirements.  These factors need taken into account when planning learning for young people.

As staff continue to work hard in the interests of their pupils, they recognise that they are part of a wider team of adults that provide the necessary support to help young people succeed. It is good to see, and hear about, the successes of schools in improving outcomes for the young people in their community.

As we look ahead to next year’s inspections, I look forward to seeing these areas develop further, helping improve attainment for our young people.

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

What’s the plan?⤴

from @ Reach

 If you get extra support at school, you may have a learning support plan. Your plan will set out targets for each term, and the support you need to reach them.

You have the right to be involved in deciding what goes in this plan. You should get the chance to talk to your teachers about whether the plan is working out well for you.

Confused? Get in touch for more advice about planning your learning and support. 

The post What’s the plan? appeared first on Reach.

DYW Interesting Practice – Calderglen High School: Inspirational learning delivered in partnership⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Calderglen High School has established far-reaching partnerships to deliver inspirational learning opportunities for young people.  The school’s strategic approach to Developing the Young Workforce ensures that all faculties actively collaborate with partners to develop and deliver a curriculum that supports the development of pupils’ employability and career management skills.
Calderglen has radically overhauled its curriculum to meet more appropriately the needs of all learners and to prepare young people for the opportunities, jobs and career pathways.  Using labour market information and incorporating work-based learning opportunities are central to providing learners with experiences that inspire career aspirations and realistic progression pathways.

Find out more about the school’s approach to career education through:

 

 

Need help to get your views heard?⤴

from @ Reach

An advocacy worker can help you share your views at meetings where decisions are made about you. They can help you work out what you want to say and can even speak for you if that’s what you want.

You can ask your school or council for help finding an advocacy worker. Or call the Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance 0131 524 1975.

If you’re care experienced, check out who your local advocate is at Who Cares? Scotland. 

The post Need help to get your views heard? appeared first on Reach.