Author Archives: Ollie Bray

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

Google Education Roadshow @kingussiehigh #NDLW17 #digitaldifference⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Kingussie Event - OB Keynote

Well it is the end of National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17).

I started the week by hosting and keynoting the Scottish leg of the Google in Education UK Roadshow at Kingussie High School and finished the week by having my latest resource 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy' published by the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL) as part of their Framework for Education Leadership. More about that here.

The Google Event had a real buzz about it on Monday and it was great to have an opportunity to work with the wider roadshow team, who are currently touring the UK as part of the Google in Education Fuel the Future Tour. A special shout out must go to Louise Jones, Oli Trussell, James Leonard and Dean Stokes for their excellent presentations - I certainly learnt a lot and realised that there are lots more features within G-Suite for Education that we could be exploiting at school.

It was also great to have 20 local authorities represented at the event and a good blend between practitioners, local authority advisors and policy makers. I am interested to see what G-Suite looks like within Glow when it becomes available as part of the productivity suite in August this year.

Kingussie Google Event - May 2017

The theme of this years National Digital Learning Week was making a #digitaldifference and for a little school in the middle of the Cairngorm National Park I think we certainly punch well above our weight in terms of making a #digitaldifference. The map below is a nice illustration of just some of our influence in the last week.18527383_10158619884970702_49681753105711023_o

 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

‘Leading a Digital Learning Strategy’ – [A @teamscel Framework for Education Leadership Resource] #NDLW17⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

SCEL Framework

In recent months I have started to get more involved with The Scottish College of Educational Leadership including being accepted on their Fellowship Programme (which I have been very much enjoying and will get around to writing about eventually!). 

SCEL supports teachers' and early years' practitioners professional learning in leadership. It was established in April 2014 following recommendations in Teaching Scotland’s Future (or the Donaldson Report) and is an organisation committed to ensuring the best possible leadership at all levels across Scotland's schools.

As part of its many activities they have developed a Framework for Education Leadership. The Framework for Education Leadership is an on-line learning resource that supports professional learning in leadership for teachers at all stages of their career. The framework is centred on a research based model which consists of four key processes to support the professional growth of teachers: reflection on practice, experimental learning, social learning processes and cognitive development. 

There are six aspects of educational leadership which underpin all learning activities within the framework. These are leading change, collaboration, self-evaluation, learning and self and others. The framework links to the professional standards of the GTCS and the SSSC.

As part of my wider work, Jay Helbert and I have worked to develop a Framework Activity titled 'Leading a Digital Learning Strategy'.

Within the learning activity practitioners have the opportunity to:

  • reflect upon national educational priorities and the school’s current position in relation to digital learning and technology
  • develop your own skills and understanding of digital learning and what this means for employability and the future
  • consider the different ways that you can learn from others and develop others in all aspects of digital learning
  • evaluate the impact of digital learning within the context of school transformation

The learning activity is split into eight simple steps, which are:

  • Refresh your knowledge on the current national priorities related to digital learning in Scottish schools
  • Identifying learning purpose
  • Evaluating choices & deciding upon resource
  • Develop an implementation plan which includes evaluation of impact on learning
  • Developing leadership of staff through digital learning
  • Developing leadership of self and colleagues
  • Evaluating impact on learning & decide next steps
  • Consider the impact of this activity upon your professional practice

We launched the new resource as part of Scotland's National Digital Learning Week in Scotland (#NDLW17) on Friday and hopefully the Scottish Education Community will find it useful?

More details about the Framework and the many other learning activities within it here: https://www.scelframework.com 

Microsoft Maker Space at #BETT2017 [@BETT_Show @microsofteduk]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

20170127_112504

I was really impressed with the Microsoft Maker Space at BETT 2017.

It was packed full of practical and fun activities for both kids and adults to try out.

I think my favourite was the robotic hand (see the video below). But there was also some really nice stuff for geography teachers on Using Computational Thinking to Understand Earthquakes and Analysing Wind Speed with Anemometers.

All of the resources are free and a new lesson plan is being released each month.

You can view the current list of resources at aka.ms/hackingstem.

 

Microsoft Maker Space at #BETT2017 [@BETT_Show @microsofteduk]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

20170127_112504

I was really impressed with the Microsoft Maker Space at BETT 2017.

It was packed full of practical and fun activities for both kids and adults to try out.

I think my favourite was the robotic hand (see the video below). But there was also some really nice stuff for geography teachers on Using Computational Thinking to Understand Earthquakes and Analysing Wind Speed with Anemometers.

All of the resources are free and a new lesson plan is being released each month.

You can view the current list of resources at aka.ms/hackingstem.

 

New ‘Hello World’ Magazine & tribute to Seymour Papert [#BETT2017 @BETT_show @Raspberry_Pi]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

Hello World

I picked up a copy of the new ‘Hello World’ Magazine at BETT 2017.

The magazine is a collaboration between  The Raspberry Pi Foundation, Computing At School (CAS), The BCS Academy of Computing and British Telecom (BT).

Hello World is a magazine about computing and digital making written by educators, for educators. With three issues each year, it contains 100 pages filled with news, features, teaching resources, reviews, research and much more.

It is designed to be cross-curricular and useful to all kinds of educators, from classroom teachers to librarians.

Now here is the best bit. It is also my favorite price... FREE, forever, for everyone online as a downloadable pdf.  

Italy-makerspaces-41b8b664bcd33056714524a8c212a7d0018fb4d7fc4c1e9818faead4e593b96e

This first issue is dedicated to Seymour Papert, in many ways the godfather of computing education (and lots of other things!). Papert was the creator of the Logo programming language and the author of some of the most important research on the role of computers in education. Inside the first edition you will find articles exploring Papert’s influence on how we think about learning, on the rise of the maker movement, and on the software that is used to teach computing today from Scratch to Greenfoot.

You can subscribe to Hello World here and due to sponsorship from BT you can also get a nice glossy version of the first three editions straight to your door!

On the subject of Seymour Papert (February 29, 1928 – July 31, 2016). Here is a nice little video about this great man's work from the Lego Foundation.

 

New ‘Hello World’ Magazine & tribute to Seymour Papert [#BETT2017 @BETT_show @Raspberry_Pi]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

 

Hello World

I picked up a copy of the new ‘Hello World’ Magazine at BETT 2017.

The magazine is a collaboration between  The Raspberry Pi Foundation, Computing At School (CAS), The BCS Academy of Computing and British Telecom (BT).

Hello World is a magazine about computing and digital making written by educators, for educators. With three issues each year, it contains 100 pages filled with news, features, teaching resources, reviews, research and much more.

It is designed to be cross-curricular and useful to all kinds of educators, from classroom teachers to librarians.

Now here is the best bit. It is also my favorite price... FREE, forever, for everyone online as a downloadable pdf.  

Italy-makerspaces-41b8b664bcd33056714524a8c212a7d0018fb4d7fc4c1e9818faead4e593b96e

This first issue is dedicated to Seymour Papert, in many ways the godfather of computing education (and lots of other things!). Papert was the creator of the Logo programming language and the author of some of the most important research on the role of computers in education. Inside the first edition you will find articles exploring Papert’s influence on how we think about learning, on the rise of the maker movement, and on the software that is used to teach computing today from Scratch to Greenfoot.

You can subscribe to Hello World here and due to sponsorship from BT you can also get a nice glossy version of the first three editions straight to your door!

On the subject of Seymour Papert (February 29, 1928 – July 31, 2016). Here is a nice little video about this great man's work from the Lego Foundation.

 

Using Social Media for Recruitment in Teaching & Education [A School Improvement Story #1]⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Social Media Fishing

Scotland (and many other parts of the world) is currently facing a teacher recruitment crisis. The crisis is currently the most prominent in the state education sector.

There are lots of reasons for this including:

  • Significant pressure on local authority budgets (leading to staffing cuts);
  • Lack of incentives (such as relocation expenses, help with housing or the creation of a rural living allowance);
  • Poor succession planning from Government (not enough new teachers in the system to replace an aging work force);
  • Teachers being attracted to more appealing jobs in the private sector (including independent and international schools); and
  • Poor advertising.

Some schools who have struggled to fill posts have turned to more imaginative ways of advertising to recruit the best candidates to the jobs at their schools.

At Kingussie High we have had success in recent years using Social Media to attract an outstanding group of teachers from a diverse range of subjects to our small rural school. This article outlines some of the things that we have learnt along the way about using Social Media for recruitment.

Facebook Banner

 

Lesson One: Social Media doesn’t recruit staff on its own.

Over the years I have heard lots of people say they are going to create a ‘viral video campaign’ to recruit a member of staff to their school. Yet when you look at the total YouTube views they rarely reach double figures. The reason for this is that social media doesn’t recruit staff on its own.

The schools that have success in using social media for recruitment will be the schools that already use social media well. They will have active Facebook and Twitter accounts as well as a modern looking website. Over time they will have built up a large social following of both current and past pupils, staff, parents, aunties, uncles, grandparents and members of the local community. This ‘tribe’ of social brand ambassadors will be the main reason that your video gets 100s, 1000s or 1,000,000s of views rather than just a couple of dozen.

KHS online

 

Lesson Two: Your Social Media Campaign is only as good as where you directed people to on the web.

Importantly, where you direct people to is not necessarily the advert or the application form. Lets face it (particularly in the public sector) most adverts and application forms are boring and sterile. You need to direct people to a web page or a web page of links that really sells your school and very importantly, as a school leader, sells why people might want to work for you.

We use the simple www.kingussiehigh.org.uk/joinus holding page as the hub of our social media campaign. It links to supplementary information about each post, provides a nice statement about the school, links to some other fun content (to help people get a feel for the team they will be joining) and of course links to the more traditional job and person specification (hosted on www.myjobscotland.gov.uk - where all of the Scottish public sector teaching jobs are listed).

 

Lesson Three – if you want to increase your viral audience you need to push the boundaries just enough to not to get the sack.

Remember, on the web controversial is often king (that is why there are so many cat videos on YouTube).

I once advertised an English teachers post and on the web version of the supplementary information I purposely muddled up ‘their’, ‘there’ & ‘they’re’ and ‘to’, ‘two’ & ‘too’. The advert spread like wild fire with lots of people keen to point out how ‘grammatically incorrect’ it was and how ‘literacy standards’ must be very poor in the Highlands of Scotland. The people who understood the humour were also the ones who made it to the bottom of the advert and discovered the disclaimer!

Here is an example of some supplementary information that we sent out to accompany a Depute Head Post. The online chatter it generated called it everything from ‘refreshing’ to a ‘disgrace!’ We had tens of thousands of views and in the end 24 applicants (many of whom would have been worthy of the position).

 

Lesson Four – Pay for on-line advertising to promote & boost your posts.

We run our social media adverts thought Facebook. It costs me £150 - £250 to put a small advert in the local paper. I normally throw about £30 - £50 on any Facebook advert. Don’t get me wrong; sometimes I think the newspaper is worth it. This is particularly the case if I am trying to recruit someone locally for a support role (office, technician, etc.). But if I want to attract a teacher from outside the area then Facebook wins hands down every time for me.

It is really important not to forget the above lessons one, two and three though. The bigger your social reach the more reach you will get with your paid advert due to its magnifying effect. Also, don’t forget to make your landing page appealing – clicks are one thing but you want people to dig deeper and apply.

The great thing about Facebook advertising is that you can set a budget and also target where and when your advert will appear on other Facebook users profiles.

Recruitment Map

Facebooks Interests etc

It is pay ‘per click’ so you only actually pay when someone clicks on your advert and they link to your landing page. You can target on a number of levels such as male or female, by age range, by geographical location, by interest or by a little bit of everything.

Facebook Budget

Once you have ‘boosted’ your advert and set it in motion you can track the amount of social vs paid views.

DHT Facebook Advert

 

Lesson Five – Use your own social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) to further promote your advert.

Basically, ask people to share within their networks. This will increase your social shares and add value to your paid advert.

 

Other Things

  • The time of the year that you advertise is really important. This is particularly important if relocation is going to be required.
  • First impressions count – what shows up in Google when you ‘Google your School’.

  KHS Google Search

Digital impressions are first impressions these days...

KHS on Google

_____________________________________________________________

About this post:

In 2017 I promised to write more on olliebray.com (which is also currently undergoing a digital overhaul in the background). I’ve committed to this new series of school improvement stories, which is really about the lessons I have learnt, mistakes I have made and things I want to share from my leadership of Kingussie High School. There will be twelve posts in total (published on the last day of each month during 2017).

January 2017 – Using Social Media for Recruitment.

February 2017 – Raising Attainment through Sport.

March 2017 – Partnership Working in the Senior Phase.

April 2017 – Constructing your Senior Phase Curriculum.

May 2017 – Using Technology to Improve learning (1).

June 2017 – Using Technology to Improve learning (2)

July 2017 – Understanding Deprivation to Improve Attainment.

August 2017 - Improving Positive Destinations.

September 2017 - Developing 3-18 Skills.

October 2017 - Making the most of your ‘local context’.

November 2017 - Developing Middle Leadership.

December 2017 - Improving progression in the BGE.

‘You know you are a Global Educator when you…’ [a book by @julielindsay] #intelvisionaries⤴

from @ OllieBray.com

Julie opening slide

I’ve known Julie Lindsay online (mainly through Twitter) for what seems like a very long time. I particularly remember some of her early work around the Flat Classroom Project that she co-founded with Vicki Davis (AKA: @coolcatteacher) back in 2006. We also share a joint early influencer in the form of David Warlick (@dwarlick) who was one of the first people to inspire me to think differently about how we use technology in schools back in 2005.

Julie is a passionate educator with a particular interest and specialisation in global education. This specialism is not surprising considering she is Australian but worked across Asia, Africa and the Middle East in a variety of international schools and universities. As well as working physically in these places Julie also has extensive experience of connecting and collaborating with hundreds of educators online.

The Global EducatorJulie was at ISTE 2016 to launch her new book, “The Global Educator”. I read the first few chapters of her book when she gave me a signed copy in Colorado last summer and I finished it off over the recent Christmas break (which now seems like a long time ago!).

Not a lot of new stuff for me personally but I can see what a useful guide this might be for someone just starting out.

Julie proposes six things that might help educators know if they were global educators or not. The six things aren't meant to be exhaustive and are really just really a guide or a self-evaluation tool.

Julie says, you know you are a Global Educator when you…

  • Connect and share - eg: has an understanding of ‘connectivism’ and networked learning, builds a personal learning network, establishes a strong global brand, contributes oneline globally daily as part of established workflow, etc.
  • ‘Flatten’ the learning - eg: learns about the world with the world, is able to sustain connections and collaborations. Understands that learning in a digital world means working with others at a distance and online, etc.
  • Encorage and model global citizenship - eg: fosters global competency through global context, has empathy learning with other cultures, adopts and encourages multiple perspectives, etc.
  • Collaborate anywhere, anytime - eg: collaborates with anyone, anywhere, anytime, in anyway possible, is adept at teacher sourcing, builds on-line global communities, etc.
  • Use online technology - eg: is able to use both synchronous and asynchronous online technologies to bring learners together, knows how to use the web to publish global experiences, is digitally fluent across devices and software, etc.
  • Design futuristic learning environments to connect with the world - eg: is able to design learning in order to develop students global competencies, in conversant with design thinking, understands the importance of collaboration as a global learning objective, etc.

In her book Julie builds on these six principles and goes into more depth about what they mean as well as providing some nice little real life examples. I personally found the list quite re-assuring but it certainly got me reflecting and thinking about how many of my staff would actually be able to tick of some (or all) of these things as regular practice.

Another part of Julie’s work that I liked was her thoughts on an Online Global Collaboration Taxonomy. Show in the picture below:

Global Collaboration Taxonomy



Overall, lots to think about and a guide that I am sure I will dip in and out of from time to time.