Author Archives: K. Mayer

DYW Annual Reports⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Governments’ Programme Board for DYW publishes DYW reports to highlight the progress made across the  5 Change Themes.  The following reports have been published so far:

  1. Annual Report 2014-15
  2. Annual Report 2015-16
  3. Annual Report 2016-17
  4. Annual Report 2017-18
  5. Annual Report 2018-19

DYW 5th Annual Progress Report available now⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Governments’ Programme Board for DYW has published its 5th Annual progress Report.  The report covers the academic year 2019 – 19 and highlights early progress made in the first part of academic year 2019/20.

Please access the report herehttps://www.gov.scot/publications/developing-young-workforce-fifth-annual-progress-report-2018-19/

 

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019 by the World Future Council during the 141st Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union in Belgrade, 16 October. The Future Policy Award is the only global award that recognises policies for the benefit of present and future generations.

The DYW programme has been selected among 67 nominated policies from 36 countries. Also known as “Oscar for Best Policies”, the Future Policy Award highlights the world’s most impactful policies which empower youth. The other winning laws and policies come from Rwanda, Estonia, Nepal, Los Angeles (USA), Senegal, South Africa and Europe.

This is an amazing achievement for the Developing the Young Workforce Programme. It is also a wonderful accolade for all the partner organisations involved and for those at every level in Scotland who have worked tirelessly to tackle youth unemployment, address inequality and develop new pathways to help young people into positive and sustained destinations. Above all, it recognises the success of young people across Scotland who have strived to overcome barriers to employment and have been empowered to develop skills for learning, life and work and to embrace new opportunities and pathways.

A great deal has been achieved and there is much we can be proud of. However, I’m sure you’ll recognise that there is still work for us to do. The next few years will be crucial as we strive to support those young people in Scotland facing the biggest barriers to employment.

 

More information about the award is available from the World Future Council website: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2019-empowering-youth/

A PIONEERING project in the Borders to help school pupils experience the workplace has hit the small screen⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Developing Young Workforce (DYW) Borders celebrated their second birthday by releasing a series of videos to showcase the impact they’ve made.

Business owners, teachers and pupils have all taken part in the filming.

Callum Weston, a sixth year pupil at Earlston High, discussed his experiences of the DYW programme.

He said: “One of the sessions I attended was welcoming and a really fun way to learn about career option from people other than teachers at school.”

The programme, which is a Scottish Government initiative that aims to bridge the gap between industry and education, has led to over 15,000 pupils attending one or more of the 130 events which DYW Borders have been involved in.

While the numbers are impressive, it is the response from the those involved that better demonstrates the positive impact of the programme.

Pauline Grigor is a parent of a pupil at Galashiels Academy. She said: “DYW Borders has been a huge help to me and my son, who has a rare medical condition.

“We worked together with the programme team to pull together a bespoke work experience plan for my son.

“This has had an amazing impact on his confidence. So much so that he has even started a part-time job. I don’t think he’d ever have managed this prior to the work experience arranged by DYW Borders.”

Educational professionals have also been quick to voice support for the programme.

Bruce Aitchison, Deputy Head Teacher at Hawick High School, said: “DYW Border is a great way for us to educate our young people on their future career options.”

The series of videos were released on January 9 – exactly two years after the initiative arrived in the Borders.

Reflecting on the success over the last two years, DYW manager Sara Ward added: “Year two for DYW Borders has been a remarkable success, really building on the solid foundations of year one.

“We have engaged with more young people, established strong working relations with more businesses and strengthened our links with those in education.

“The entire team of staff and volunteers are proud to have achieved so much across the region as part of this national programme, and we look forward to doing even more in 2019

Young Enterprise ‘Tenner Programme’ contributes to SQA Personal Development Awards⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

SQA and Young Enterprise Scotland have been working together to demonstrate how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards of some SQA units.

Young Enterprise Scotland’s Tenner Challenge, in which participants make as much profit as possible from £10, provides an interactive way for learners to develop employability skills. The Tenner Challenge helps learners to develop skills including creativity, resilience and problem solving.

This document and case study outline how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards for the SQA units Personal Development: Self and Work (H18P 44) and Enterprise Activity (D36N 10).

Once evidence has been gathered via the Tenner Challenge, centres will have to check learners’ work against the Assessment Standards for the SQA units. The examples provided here illustrate the type of activities and evidence that are likely to generate appropriate evidence.

The contribution that Young Enterprise’s Tenner Challenge offers, in terms of evidence, will also depend on the range of activities that are being undertaken.

All evidence must be subject to rigorous assessment procedures and internal verification.

Academy 9 Project – National conference, 19 and 20 March 2019⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

You are invited to the first Academy9 ‘Building a Legacy’ conference – inspired by the A9 Dualling Programme.

 The interactive event will showcase the award-winning Academy9
Programme, which has seen industry educate and inspire thousands
of young people from Perth to Inverness in STEM (Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).
We will lift the lid on the secrets of its success to inspire others.

Selected workshop highlights include:

    • Enhancing Construction Safety – Digital Careers now and the future; Harnessing Digital Technolog
    • Creating Effective Educational Programme
    • Delivering the STEM Education Strategy for Scotland
    • Developing and Keeping a Skilled Workforce – ‘New Industry in Scotland 2020
    • Enhancing Construction Safety – Digital Careers now and the future; Harnessing Digital Technology

More information here:   TS Academy9 Conference 2019 A5 Flyer WEB

New NHSScotland Careers Resource pack now available!⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

NHS Education for Scotland has developed an NHSScotland Careers Resource pack which is fresh out of the box and ‘ready to go’! The pack contains a ready-made set of lessons with everything you need for a one-off lesson or a full Unit of five lessons.

The pack contains:   A comprehensive booklet called ‘A Career for You in Health’ which is a guide to every job family in NHSScotland. This booklet contains everything pupils need to know about entry requirements, skills, values and much more for each job role.

An NHSScotland Careers teaching unit with resources for use in one-to-one career guidance, group sessions, drop-in clinics and events like parents’ evenings. These include:

  • ready-made slide packs e.g. ‘Introduction to NHSScotland’
  • a ‘word bank’ with vocabulary for use in CVs or to support understanding of NHSscotland job advertisements
  • job profiles for a variety of job roles in NHSScotland, from gardener to doctor, from midwife to IT engineer!
  • engaging pupil resources including quizzes and creative activities

To ensure that the learning is relevant for use in schools, the resource pack aligns with

  1. The Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Curriculum for Excellence: Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes
  3. SDS Career Management Skills framework

A job family leaflet showing all NHSScotland job families ‘at a glance’ which could be used with individuals, small groups, classes or at events such as parents’ evenings.

Look no further for a source of information and materials about NHSScotland careers!

Download the pack today at:  http://bit.ly/2zYdLYL

All you need to know about Founders4Schools⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

What is Founders 4 Schools:

  • A free online platform to help you find people from the world of work willing to engage with your school and share their knowledge with your pupils.
  • Our system filters speakers to ensure they meet the needs of your school.
  • Communications with speakers are undertaken through a secure online platform that saves you time and helps to ensure the highest quality speakers.
  • We also automate support communications on logistics and administration to further lighten the load.

How it helps teachers:

  • Makes it easy to link school students with people from the world of work.
  • Industry links that help support specific curricular developments such as STEM, Maths, Modern Languages and the Developing the Young Workforce agenda as a whole.
  • As a CPD opportunity using our Teacher Insight Event type.
  • Find speakers for “world of work” days.
  • By supporting careers and employment related PSE programmes through free resources and lesson plans.
  • Prepare for Inspection by providing access to high quality, research informed resources and practice.
  • Impact positively on Post 16 destinations.

Benefits for pupils:

  • Awareness of the world of work
  • Inspirational encounters
  • Employability experiences that support UCAS applications (particularly in key areas such as STEM).
  • A good knowledge of local employment opportunities.
  • Preparation for the transition to employment.

What to expect:

  • Research the encounter types available in Scotland, all of which have full curricular mapping available to download, by looking at our Educator page.
  • Book an event for the young people at your school! Just type in the postcode of your school to get started and connect with local business leaders.
  • Once the event has been submitted you can login to your account and get live updates on your events using your Teacher Dashboard.
  • You can use your Teacher Dashboard to email business volunteers as well. Starting a conversation with them is crucial to building up a relationship, and ensuring a successful event.
  • Don’t forget to look at your Event Page! Links to this will be available in your dashboard and are a really useful to share information about your event on social media, and also just very useful to print off and leave with the school office for the day of the event itself.
  • You can always check out our Educator’s Tips page for further advice.

Next steps:

  • Take a look at our website and explore the opportunities available for you and the young people you teach.
  • If you have any queries we’d love to hear from you. scotland@founders4schools.org.uk

Civil engineering apprenticeship has laid foundation for Sophia’s career⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Taking a Foundation Apprenticeship gave Sophia Findlay the chance to find out what a career in engineering would be like and now it’s cemented her plans for the future.

The 17-year-old from Springboig in Glasgow was planning to leave school at the end of fifth year and didn’t know what she wanted to do for a living.

Then, her mum told her about opportunities through Foundation Apprenticeships.

The St. Andrew’s RC Secondary pupil chose to take a Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering in fifth year, alongside other school subjects.

Foundation Apprenticeships give senior school pupils the chance to spend time out of the classroom with a learning provider and gain experience in a work environment.

Completion leads to a qualification at the same level as a Higher, to progress into work including Modern and Graduate Apprenticeships as well as being recognised for entry into colleges and universities across Scotland.

Sophia explained: “I had no real plan about what I wanted to do and thought I could maybe go to college and take up an art course.

“My mum told me about Foundation Apprenticeships and thought it would be worth doing because I would get work experience with a qualification and be able to stay in school until sixth year.”

Sophia took the Foundation Apprenticeship in Civil Engineering at Glasgow Kelvin College alongside her other school subjects.

In the first year, Sophia went to college two half days a week.  “My first year at college was really good” said Sophia. “I wasn’t sure what to expect, but there were also two other girls doing the Foundation Apprenticeship, so I felt more comfortable. The learning eased us in well because we weren’t bombarded with a lot of information.”

Now Sophia’s out of school one day a week getting her hands dirty, working on building sites with social housing developer, McTaggart Construction.

“At the moment I get to watch and learn,” said Sophia. “I’m looking forward to learn on the job and get hands on experience.”

Doing the Foundation Apprenticeship has opened her eyes up to different aspects of engineering Sophia didn’t know about, which has now given her a clear idea of what career she wants to pursue.

Sophia said: “I got to find out more about the career choices in Civil Engineering through the Foundation Apprenticeship and I thought they were fascinating.

“There is an opportunity to work in areas like flood protection and environmental protection, which really appeals to me because they are dealing with important issues.”

Ross Hammell, Sustainable Communities Programme Manager at McTaggart Construction:

“McTaggart Construction sees FA’s as a key element of our talent pipeline mix, alongside other traditional academic and vocational routes. The construction industry needs many more confident, hardworking young people across all disciplines to address the current skills shortage we face. The world of work can be a shock to a lot of school leavers, therefore FA’s offer the opportunity to gain a true understanding of a potential career path before they’ve even left school.”

“Since starting her FA with McTaggart Construction, Sophia has gained a lot of confidence which has enabled her to ask more questions and get more from her time on site, applying academic learning.”

Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has changed Sophia’s opinion of school.

She explained: “Taking the Foundation Apprenticeship has given me something to look forward to and I’m excited to learn what the career would be like.

“Getting the experience of college and the workplace with my Foundation Apprenticeship has made me happier and more confident.”

Peter Brown, Senior Curriculum Manager from Glasgow Kelvin College said: “The Foundation Apprenticeship programme provides a range of benefits to our learners, chief among these being the opportunity to undertake a long-term work placement with an employer.

“During this time learners are given an invaluable insight into the world of work and a hands-on experience which inspires and shapes their future career paths whilst also preparing and equipping them with skills that are valued by industry.

“Furthermore, the Foundation Apprenticeship offers them the opportunity to learn in a programme and environment that has been solely designed with employment in mind.   Subjects they are currently studying at school e.g. Maths, Physics or IT are given real-world value through contextualisation and simulation of industry.  As a result, many learners better engage at school as abstract concepts now have real meaning and importance to their future career aspirations.”

Foundation Apprenticeships are developed by Skills Development Scotland, in partnership with employers and funded by European Social Fund.

TES feature: Primary career education should broaden children’s horizons⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

By Nich Chambers for TES

The focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on ‘career-related learning’, argues Nick Chambers

The last few months have seen a sudden enthusiasm for careers education in primary schools. Of course, it is a simple and seductive idea.
But many teachers and parents have expressed their concerns that we risk making our children grow up too fast. They are understandably concerned about the dangers in directing children towards a particular career or job at a time when their aspirations should be wide-ranging and, in large part, without boundaries.
I share their concerns. We should not be providing careers advice in primary schools: instead we should focus on broadening horizons and raising aspirations, giving children a wide range of experiences including the world of work. It is about opening doors, showing children the vast range of possibilities and helping to keep their options open for as long as possible.
And there are a range of attributes, skills and behaviours that can be encouraged in this early stage of a child’s life that will leave them in the best possible position as they begin their transitions to secondary education and to future life.
There is often alarm, too, when people hear or read the word ‘careers’ in the same sentence as primary schools. In my opinion, the focus for primary schools shouldn’t be on ‘careers advice’ but on what I refer to as ‘career-related learning’.
Teachers would tend to agree. Our recent survey, in partnership with Tes and the NAHT headteachers’ union, found that the majority of teachers believe that children should be learning about the world of work and different jobs in their first years of primary school. Nearly half (47 per cent) believed this should start from age five and under and that linking learning to the real world helped increase motivation, broaden aspirations and challenge gender stereotypes.
Politicians, too, are on side. Robert Halfon MP, chair of the Commons Education Select Committee was spot on in saying in Tes recently: “The impact of early engagement can have a hugely positive impact on wider academic attainment, motivating and inspiring both children and their families, by helping them to see a future to which they can aspire and which feels achievable.”
Earlier this year we tried to explore this a little further by exploring who primary-aged children ideally want to become, and, what shapes (and often limits) their career aspirations and dreams for the future. Drawing the Future asked children aged 7 to 11 to draw a picture of the job they wanted to do when they grew up. More than 13,000 children took part in the UK and it was clear that, from a young age, many children had ideas about careers. Some 36 per cent of children from as young as seven years old, based their career aspirations on people they knew. For those who didn’t know anyone who did the job they drew, 45 per cent stated that TV, film and radio were the biggest factors influencing their choice.
Meanwhile, less than 1 per cent of children knew about a job from someone visiting their school. This has huge implications for social mobility, as children from poorer backgrounds may not have access to successful role models from the world of work and their aspirations are limited as a result.
All children, regardless of their background should get the chance to meet a wide range of people doing different jobs, in different sectors and at different levels – from apprentices to CEOs.
This is essential if we are to improve social mobility and gender and ethnic equality. It is vital we support children to challenge the perceptions they may have about certain jobs, and to better understand the evolving world they are growing up in while they are still in primary school.
While teachers appreciate the importance to children of career-related learning many say that the lack of time and availability of volunteers are preventing them doing more. The NAHT has taken a lead to tackle this and created Primary Futures in partnership with my charity, Education and Employers.

Emma Fieldhouse from South Parade Primary school in Wakefield explains why her school got involved: “It was amazing to see the children talking and listening to the volunteers, and each other, as they begin to make the link between what they do in school every day and the exciting world of the future where they will be the next scientists, teachers, politicians, vets”.
We must not rest until we see this kind of ambition running through all of our students in all of our primary schools.

Nick Chambers is the founder and chief executive officer of the charity Education and Employers. The charity runs Inspiring the Future and its Primary Futures and Inspiring Women programmes and undertakes research into the effectiveness of employer engagement