Author Archives: K. Mayer

DYW – Quick Start Guide⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following information outlines the core essentials around DYW, in order to provide a quick overview and introduction to support  planning and implementation.  It includes the following sections:

  • What DYW is? – Introduction
  • What are the key priorities? – DYW essentials
  • Key Resources

What is Developing the Young Workforce?

Developing the Young Workforce is a seven year programme to reduce youth unemployment by 40% by 2021.
 The national milestones are set out in Scotland’s Youth Employment Strategy.  The programme is built on the CfE entitlements for children and young people set out in 2008 in Building the Curriculum 3.  DYW is a key education policy, as highlighted by John Swinney at consecutive SLF addresses : “Our education policy is enshrined by three major policies, Getting it Right for Every Child, Curriculum for Excellence and Developing Scotland’s Young Workforce.” (SLF 2017) A focus on STEM sits at the heart of DYW. The Digital Learning and Teaching Strategy, Making Maths Count report and  STEM Strategy for Scotland  will contribute useful and relevant insights.  DYW has a particular and significant contribution to make in realising the Scottish Attainment Challenge outcomes, in particular priority 4: Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school-leaver destinations for all young people.

DYW Essentials:   What are the key DYW priorities ?

1. The Career Education Standard (CES 3-18):     Read the Career Education Scotland (3-18).  This document contains the key entitlements and expectations around DYW in education and provides guidance for planning and progression.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent am I familiar with the entitlements and expectations outlined within the CES 3-18?
  • To what extent do I use the CES 3-18 to plan relevant and coherent learning experiences?

2. Education -Employer Partnerships:    Establishments need to continue to develop sustainable partnerships with employers, businesses and colleges, which will enable the delivery of meaningful work-related and work-based learning opportunities.

Reflective question:

  • What type of education-employer partnerships do I currently have in place?
  • How do I ensure that these partnerships are effective and sustainable?
  • To what extent do the partnerships contribute to the curriculum design and delivery?

3. Curriculum design:   Embed DYW consistently across all that is planned for children and young people throughout education, ie. within the curriculum,  through interdisciplinary Learning, Personal Learning and Achievement and  the life and ethos of the school as a community.  For more information see Scotland’s Curriculum Refresh Narrative.   Resources for teachers and practitioners can be access on My World of Work.

In secondary schools learner pathways should be planned to reflect the needs and aspirations of young people and offer a diverse range of tailored learning programmes from BGE into the senior phase.  This should draw on a wide range of work-related courses such as Foundation Apprenticeships, Skills for Work modules, HNCs etc delivered in collaboration with colleges, training provides and employers alongside traditional subject choices.

Reflective question

  • How effectively do you plan for career education opportunities and progression pathways for learners in your school?
  • In what ways does the curriculum provision and timetabling in your establishment incorporate career education for all learners?

4.  Connect learning with the world of work:  Whenever relevant learning should be linked to careers, the labour market, employability both theoretically as well as practically.    Education establishments should therefore create work-related learning opportunities for all learners from early years to senior phase.  This may include career insight, work  inspiration, enterprise, simulated  work environments connections.   Work-based learning should be provide to all learners aqs and when required, particularly however in the senior phase.  The implementation of the Work Placement Standard should be an integral element of this.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent do I plan and incorporate work-related learning opportunities across the curriculum
  • To what extent are partners involved in delivering meaningful, work-related experiences for learners,  the delivery of skills and qualifications and highlighting prospective career opportunities?
  • To what extent do all learners our have access to relevant work-based learning experiences and palcements.

5. Improvement Planning:  DYW should be included within the establishment improvement plan and the targets should be realistic and manageable and able to be overtaken in one school year. External partners, such as employers, community learning and development and colleges, and parents should be part of the improvement planning process.  However the voice of young people  should be clear in the establishment improvement plan.   All DYW activity and targets should be clearly focussed on outcomes for learners.

Reflective question:

  • What impact are improvement measures having on learning, success, achievement, confidence, positive destinations and so on?

6. Skills:   There should be a clearer focus on enabling children and young people to recognise and track their own skills development and achievements across their learning.

Reflective Questions:

  •  How effective are profiling processes across the school/establishment?
  • To what extent do I provide opportunities to engage in profiling that supports learning and the development of skills for work and future career choices?
  • How well do I engage children and young people in meaningful discussion about their achievement within and outwith school, the development of their skills and assist them in profiling these to support their career journeys?

7.  Equalities and Inclusion:   Planning for DYW should address issues of equity, equality and inclusion. This includes: addressing parity of esteem across all types of learning and future destinations; challenging gender stereotyping; and meeting the specific needs of young people with additional support needs, from black and minority ethnic communities and those with experience of living in care.

Reflective question:

  • To what extent is our DYW offer inclusive of all learners and challenges stereotypes and bias with regard to gender, race/ethnicity, disability and learners with additional support needs ?

Resources to help you:

Next steps

  • Sign up for Education Scotland’s DYW e-newsletter
  • Find DYW news and information on the Education Scotland Learning Blog
  • Follow us on Twitter, https://twitter.com/ESskills @ESSkills

DYW – Professional Dialogue: Virtual engagement sessions⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In order to support your development work and thinking around DYW  we would like to provide you with the opportunity for professional dialogue with colleagues over the coming months.  We have therefore  set up the following 3 virtual workshop sessions (interactive webinars) for you:

1,   DYW – Virtual Drop in session –  4 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will allow teachers and practitioners involved in the delivery of DYW to link up with colleagues and share their current development work, discuss challenges and questions and explore ideas.  Register for the event here:  (Eventbrite link)

2.  DYW – Online Focus session 1:   27 May (11.00 – 12.30)

This session will enable teachers and practitioners to explore key DYW themes collectively.  The workshops will introduce main aspects around selected themes and allow for professional dialogue and enquiry. This will be practical and interactive in nature and include exemplification.  Materials used on the day will be shared with registered practitioners in advance.

Please indicated in the application form  topics you would be most interested in discussion on the day:

  1. Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18
  2. Work placements and work-related learning
  3. Embedding skills across learning
  4. Developing effective DYW  School  Partnerships
  5. Data driven dialogue: A process guide to reviewing school/education data
  6. Curriculum design:  Providing diverse learning pathways
  7. Equalities and Inclusion in the context of DYW
  8. Other:  (please specify)

Register for the event here:  (Eventbrite link)

3.  DYW – Online Focus session 2:   16 June (10.00 – 11.30) 

The programme of the event follows the structure outlined above.

Register for the event here:  (Eventbrite link)

 

All registered participants for the above 3sessions will be sent access information closer to the date of the events.

 

DYW Learning Resources: Collated offer⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

 

(To be developed)

Career Education Standard (3-18): Suite of Learning Resources
Career Education Standard – Exemplification Tool
CES 3-18 Reflection tool and Self-evaluation Wheel
Moray Skills Pathways
Guidance and learning resource: Profiling skills and achievements in the context of career education
A self-evaluation guide for school/college partnerships
Senior Phase Benchmarking Tool
Learning pathways: Senior Phase design
DYW- Embedding equality into resources for learning’ guide
Improving gender balance from 3-18
Improving gender balance – Gender friendly physics
Improving gender balance – Big Me
School-Employer Partnerships

DYW – Support Offer⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In these unprecedented times Education Scotland would like to ensure you continue to get the professional support you may require around DYW over the next months.

the following will provide you with an offer of key professional online support:

  1.  A quick start guide to DYW: This includes the key essential around DYW such as main documents, key links to latest information and updates.
  2.  Professional learning and reflection tools:  here you find all the essential tools and learning modules collated in one area.
  3. Career, Information, Advice and Guidance – My World of Work:  This is Skills Development Scotland’s online support hub for teachers and practitioners as well as learners .  It contains classroom resources, Labour Market Information, guidance on Meta – and Career Management Skills amongst a range of other interactive and engaging resources
  4.  Online professional dialogue – virtual meetings:  We have set up 3 session for teachers and practitioners to ‘get together’ in order  to share their DYW experiences, exchange information and discuss challenges.
  5.  National Improvement Hub – DYW  Summary Page:  This website page contains all our resources, tools, exemplification etc. in one place.  .

For more information on the above please follow the links.

If you have any specific questions please don’t hesitate to contact us directly at:  EDSDES@educationscotland.gov.scot

DYW National Leads – Education and Regional Employer Groups⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

The following lists the main DYW National Education and Regional Employer Group leads:

DYW Regional Employer Groups:

Argyll & Bute Harvey Agnes
Argyll & Bute Anderson Scott
Ayrshire Baird Claire
Borders Ward Sara
Dumfries & Galloway Galloway Graeme
Dundee & Angus Tasker Hilary
Edinburgh & Lothian Fenwick Michelle
Fife Hepburn Ryan
Forth Valley Henderson Jen
Glasgow Crawford Nicola
Glasgow MacPherson Shona
Inverness – Central Highland Maxtone Andy
Inverness – Central Highland Nicol Stewart
Lanarkshire Nimmo Alison
Moray Baxter Sarah
North East Holland Mary
North east Holland Mary
North Highland Morris Trudy
Orkney Scarth Rachel
Outer Hebrides Chisholm Bernard
Outer Hebrides Smith Dolina
Perth & Kinross Carroll John
Shetland Bray Gail
West Davidson Bob
West Highland Benfield Lesley
West Highland Maclean Colleen
West Lothian Brown Lauren

Education:

Aberdeenshire Ritchie Andrew
Angus Brown Russell
Angus Morris Jeremy
Argyll & Bute Turnbull Martin
City of Aberdeen Duncan Alex
City of Dundee Tracey Stewart
City of Edinburgh Porter Roberta
City of Glasgow Gerry Lyons
Clackmannanshire Sanda Lorraine
Clackmannanshire Whyte Clark
Comhairle nan Eilean Siar
(Western Isles)
Stewart Ian
Dumfries & Galloway McEwen Melanie
Dumfries & Galloway Watson Lesley
Dumfries & Galloway Young Alastair
East Ayrshire Burgoyne Ian
East Dunbartonshire Pollok Jan
East Dunbartonshire
East Lothian Craik Collins Neil
East Lothian Higgins Katie
East Lothian Hood Alison
East Renfrew Creighton Clare
East Renfrew Ratter Mark
East Renfrewshire Clinton Linda
Falkirk Watson Leigh
Fife Ryan Hepburn
Highland Brown Beth
Highland Gillies Ann
Highland James Vance
Highland Mackay Aileen
Inverclyde Lamb Robert
Midlothain Lang Annette
Moray Garson Maxine
North Ayrshire Cook Laura
North Lanarkshire O’Neill Pauline
Orkney Bevan Graham
Orkney Wylie James
Perth & Kinross Ramsay Kim
Perth & Kinross Macluskey David
Renfrewshire Jessica Dradge
Renfrewshire Sneddon Maureen
Scottish Borders Thomson Catherine
Scottish Borders
Shetland Thompson Shona
South Ayrshire Pitt Gavin
South Lanarkshire Walker Caroline
Stirling Henderson Tracy
West Dunbartonshire Brown Andrew
West Lothian McKay Stuart

DYW Annual Reports⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Governments’ Programme Board for DYW publishes DYW reports to highlight the progress made across the  5 Change Themes.  The following reports have been published so far:

  1. Annual Report 2014-15
  2. Annual Report 2015-16
  3. Annual Report 2016-17
  4. Annual Report 2017-18
  5. Annual Report 2018-19

DYW 5th Annual Progress Report available now⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scottish Governments’ Programme Board for DYW has published its 5th Annual progress Report.  The report covers the academic year 2019 – 19 and highlights early progress made in the first part of academic year 2019/20.

Please access the report herehttps://www.gov.scot/publications/developing-young-workforce-fifth-annual-progress-report-2018-19/

 

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Scotland’s Developing the Young Workforce Programme has been awarded the Future Policy Silver Award 2019 by the World Future Council during the 141st Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union in Belgrade, 16 October. The Future Policy Award is the only global award that recognises policies for the benefit of present and future generations.

The DYW programme has been selected among 67 nominated policies from 36 countries. Also known as “Oscar for Best Policies”, the Future Policy Award highlights the world’s most impactful policies which empower youth. The other winning laws and policies come from Rwanda, Estonia, Nepal, Los Angeles (USA), Senegal, South Africa and Europe.

This is an amazing achievement for the Developing the Young Workforce Programme. It is also a wonderful accolade for all the partner organisations involved and for those at every level in Scotland who have worked tirelessly to tackle youth unemployment, address inequality and develop new pathways to help young people into positive and sustained destinations. Above all, it recognises the success of young people across Scotland who have strived to overcome barriers to employment and have been empowered to develop skills for learning, life and work and to embrace new opportunities and pathways.

A great deal has been achieved and there is much we can be proud of. However, I’m sure you’ll recognise that there is still work for us to do. The next few years will be crucial as we strive to support those young people in Scotland facing the biggest barriers to employment.

 

More information about the award is available from the World Future Council website: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/2019-empowering-youth/

A PIONEERING project in the Borders to help school pupils experience the workplace has hit the small screen⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Developing Young Workforce (DYW) Borders celebrated their second birthday by releasing a series of videos to showcase the impact they’ve made.

Business owners, teachers and pupils have all taken part in the filming.

Callum Weston, a sixth year pupil at Earlston High, discussed his experiences of the DYW programme.

He said: “One of the sessions I attended was welcoming and a really fun way to learn about career option from people other than teachers at school.”

The programme, which is a Scottish Government initiative that aims to bridge the gap between industry and education, has led to over 15,000 pupils attending one or more of the 130 events which DYW Borders have been involved in.

While the numbers are impressive, it is the response from the those involved that better demonstrates the positive impact of the programme.

Pauline Grigor is a parent of a pupil at Galashiels Academy. She said: “DYW Borders has been a huge help to me and my son, who has a rare medical condition.

“We worked together with the programme team to pull together a bespoke work experience plan for my son.

“This has had an amazing impact on his confidence. So much so that he has even started a part-time job. I don’t think he’d ever have managed this prior to the work experience arranged by DYW Borders.”

Educational professionals have also been quick to voice support for the programme.

Bruce Aitchison, Deputy Head Teacher at Hawick High School, said: “DYW Border is a great way for us to educate our young people on their future career options.”

The series of videos were released on January 9 – exactly two years after the initiative arrived in the Borders.

Reflecting on the success over the last two years, DYW manager Sara Ward added: “Year two for DYW Borders has been a remarkable success, really building on the solid foundations of year one.

“We have engaged with more young people, established strong working relations with more businesses and strengthened our links with those in education.

“The entire team of staff and volunteers are proud to have achieved so much across the region as part of this national programme, and we look forward to doing even more in 2019

Young Enterprise ‘Tenner Programme’ contributes to SQA Personal Development Awards⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

SQA and Young Enterprise Scotland have been working together to demonstrate how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards of some SQA units.

Young Enterprise Scotland’s Tenner Challenge, in which participants make as much profit as possible from £10, provides an interactive way for learners to develop employability skills. The Tenner Challenge helps learners to develop skills including creativity, resilience and problem solving.

This document and case study outline how the Tenner Challenge could generate evidence that meets the assessment standards for the SQA units Personal Development: Self and Work (H18P 44) and Enterprise Activity (D36N 10).

Once evidence has been gathered via the Tenner Challenge, centres will have to check learners’ work against the Assessment Standards for the SQA units. The examples provided here illustrate the type of activities and evidence that are likely to generate appropriate evidence.

The contribution that Young Enterprise’s Tenner Challenge offers, in terms of evidence, will also depend on the range of activities that are being undertaken.

All evidence must be subject to rigorous assessment procedures and internal verification.