Author Archives: Joe Wilson

#Jisc #FELTAG UK FE and Skills Coalition London⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


I had the opportunity to present to the #FELTAG FE and Skills Coalition in London this week on the challenges I see around the vocational reform programme in England and the opportunities emerging from this. I will not rehearse them all here but  will offer a short summary.

I think the system is becoming comfortable but needs more challenge around delivering 20% of apprenticeship programmes off the job. There is still room for more innovation around on-line delivery. Training organisations unused to classroom delivery need most support here in shaping innovative on-line offerings.

The main challenges lie around how to manage the movement of learners through programmes and towards end point assessement without the scaffolding of the unit based qualifications that existed in previous frameworks. There is an opportunity here for open badges and other forms of micro-credentials.  You can see City and Guilds and the other former awarding bodies that operated in this space positioning their delivery systems to supply learner content and step by step assessments that are supported by open badges.

Managing learmers progress is a mechanistic  challenge too.  Many frameworks require the collection of  on-going evidence to be presented at end point assessment. The system as a whole needs new approaches to e-portfolios that better support learning and development.  The previous vocational system was over reliant on checklist based systems while the systems that are used in Higher Education are too aimed at deep reflection against very broad outcomes.  The ideal system for the new apprenticeships lies somewhere in the middle - twinned with an reliable virtual learning environment for learner delivery and tracking. This to allow trainees, employers, training providers and End Point Assessment providers a window on the progress of the learning.  Trainees need to be highly confident that they are ready for end point assessment.

For providers there is still a challenge around making sure that there is a consistency of decision making and reliable quality control both around delivery and in decisions about predicting gradings.
Grading is a new concept in this area of training.  There needs to be greater transparency around the quality assurance mechanisms for End Point Assessments. Candidates and training providers need clear guidance both around understanding the pass/fail criteria and the grading criteria in many frameworks.

There remain some gaps - some of which might have been held up by the general election. I think many observers were anticipating the publication of a new set of digital competency standards around digital literacy to be published in England. This to form part of the underpinning essential skills for apprenticeships. There is already a new framework in place in Wales.

There remain too some deeper structural challenges that need tidied up by the new Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education. Some standards and assessment standards are not fit for purpose though published and approved. Probably best exemplified by the diminishing but still stubbornly high list of frameworks with no end point assessment body. This is still a potential crisis needing averted. The offer for non-levy paying employers still seems unclear and will stop many SME employers engaging with the programme. I think too the cost of end point assessment may act as a deterrent for both employers and employees in achieving fully qualified status.

From a Scottish view point 

As someone with a lot of experience of this sector in UK and internationally I understand the English drivers for many of these changes - but I don't agree with many of the reforms. I think the system should be rightly very anxious about the next wave of changes in trying to shoe horn vocational delivery towards 15 strands. Yes,  they do things like this in New Zealand and in other vocational systems but not in the manner that is being attempted in England.

I wish the term UK Vocational Reform Programme was used less - in what is in essence and practice an English Vocational Reform programme.

But I am jealous about some of the high level movement and thinking going on.

On the data side, the willingness to make more use of the Universal Learning Number ( we have had this in Scotland since the 1970's, the Scottish Candidate Number,  but have never fully exploited its utility around reporting learner progress through all of our learning system) The work around both the Individual Learning Record and the Individual Learning Plan with that focus on how the system supports and pushes on the performance and achievement of the learner so that centres are  not rewarded for simply allowing the learner to mark time is something the Scottish system should be exploring.  Yes,  it does take some learners longer than others to achieve but system should be working to understand this.  It will be interesting to see how the final link to HMRC shows a clear link to income and productivity. Would be great to see some of these approaches in Scotland.

We have data and some of these tools but have lacked the willingness and ambition to join this data up in Scotland.

I like too the grading of apprenticeships - as will employers and apprentices - but I think you can achieve this without the cost and disruption of End Point Assessment.

I like too the broader ambitions of the graduate apprenticeship programmes in England . In Scotland we are doing these targeted at areas where there has been a lack of flexibility from the Universities and a latent demand from industry. In England you are doing this too  but also building a rich set of alternative pathways into the professions like law and accountancy. This will really close the academic and vocational divide.

Finally I like the innovation around delivery and assessment that has been driven by both the FELTAG coalition and by the changing landscape shaped by the vocational reform programme. There is a greater sense of urgency to adopt new delivery methods and drive up the technical capacity of centres and teaching staff in English Colleges and training providers.  We do have some excellent practice in Scotland but it is more distributed.  Jisc and other have been doing a great job in supporting centres through this period of change .

I'll do a follow up post on the growing list of support available for centres in this new landscape.







#Jisc #FELTAG UK FE and Skills Coalition London⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


I had the opportunity to present to the #FELTAG FE and Skills Coalition in London this week on the challenges I see around the vocational reform programme in England and the opportunities emerging from this. I will not rehearse them all here but  will offer a short summary.

I think the system is becoming comfortable but needs more challenge around delivering 20% of apprenticeship programmes off the job. There is still room for more innovation around on-line delivery. Training organisations unused to classroom delivery need most support here in shaping innovative on-line offerings.

The main challenges lie around how to manage the movement of learners through programmes and towards end point assessement without the scaffolding of the unit based qualifications that existed in previous frameworks. There is an opportunity here for open badges and other forms of micro-credentials.  You can see City and Guilds and the other former awarding bodies that operated in this space positioning their delivery systems to supply learner content and step by step assessments that are supported by open badges.

Managing learmers progress is a mechanistic  challenge too.  Many frameworks require the collection of  on-going evidence to be presented at end point assessment. The system as a whole needs new approaches to e-portfolios that better support learning and development.  The previous vocational system was over reliant on checklist based systems while the systems that are used in Higher Education are too aimed at deep reflection against very broad outcomes.  The ideal system for the new apprenticeships lies somewhere in the middle - twinned with an reliable virtual learning environment for learner delivery and tracking. This to allow trainees, employers, training providers and End Point Assessment providers a window on the progress of the learning.  Trainees need to be highly confident that they are ready for end point assessment.

For providers there is still a challenge around making sure that there is a consistency of decision making and reliable quality control both around delivery and in decisions about predicting gradings.
Grading is a new concept in this area of training.  There needs to be greater transparency around the quality assurance mechanisms for End Point Assessments. Candidates and training providers need clear guidance both around understanding the pass/fail criteria and the grading criteria in many frameworks.

There remain some gaps - some of which might have been held up by the general election. I think many observers were anticipating the publication of a new set of digital competency standards around digital literacy to be published in England. This to form part of the underpinning essential skills for apprenticeships. There is already a new framework in place in Wales.

There remain too some deeper structural challenges that need tidied up by the new Institute of Apprenticeships and Technical Education. Some standards and assessment standards are not fit for purpose though published and approved. Probably best exemplified by the diminishing but still stubbornly high list of frameworks with no end point assessment body. This is still a potential crisis needing averted. The offer for non-levy paying employers still seems unclear and will stop many SME employers engaging with the programme. I think too the cost of end point assessment may act as a deterrent for both employers and employees in achieving fully qualified status.

From a Scottish view point 

As someone with a lot of experience of this sector in UK and internationally I understand the English drivers for many of these changes - but I don't agree with many of the reforms. I think the system should be rightly very anxious about the next wave of changes in trying to shoe horn vocational delivery towards 15 strands. Yes,  they do things like this in New Zealand and in other vocational systems but not in the manner that is being attempted in England.

I wish the term UK Vocational Reform Programme was used less - in what is in essence and practice an English Vocational Reform programme.

But I am jealous about some of the high level movement and thinking going on.

On the data side, the willingness to make more use of the Universal Learning Number ( we have had this in Scotland since the 1970's, the Scottish Candidate Number,  but have never fully exploited its utility around reporting learner progress through all of our learning system) The work around both the Individual Learning Record and the Individual Learning Plan with that focus on how the system supports and pushes on the performance and achievement of the learner so that centres are  not rewarded for simply allowing the learner to mark time is something the Scottish system should be exploring.  Yes,  it does take some learners longer than others to achieve but system should be working to understand this.  It will be interesting to see how the final link to HMRC shows a clear link to income and productivity. Would be great to see some of these approaches in Scotland.

We have data and some of these tools but have lacked the willingness and ambition to join this data up in Scotland.

I like too the grading of apprenticeships - as will employers and apprentices - but I think you can achieve this without the cost and disruption of End Point Assessment.

I like too the broader ambitions of the graduate apprenticeship programmes in England . In Scotland we are doing these targeted at areas where there has been a lack of flexibility from the Universities and a latent demand from industry. In England you are doing this too  but also building a rich set of alternative pathways into the professions like law and accountancy. This will really close the academic and vocational divide.

Finally I like the innovation around delivery and assessment that has been driven by both the FELTAG coalition and by the changing landscape shaped by the vocational reform programme. There is a greater sense of urgency to adopt new delivery methods and drive up the technical capacity of centres and teaching staff in English Colleges and training providers.  We do have some excellent practice in Scotland but it is more distributed.  Jisc and other have been doing a great job in supporting centres through this period of change .

I'll do a follow up post on the growing list of support available for centres in this new landscape.







Klik2Learn⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog




                                                                                
I spotted this company some years ago while working at SQA since then they have done well in establishing both a Scottish and an international footprint for their innovative English language learning materials  . Their voice recognition software to support English language acquisition and development is particularly innovative and effective. 

Ann the CEO has drawn my attention to their latest development. I think there are some real benefits to explore here for Colleges willing to partner with Klik2Learn. 

I think Colleges and ESOL training organisations across the UK will be interested in this. 

I'll let Ann explain the rest .... 


Hello, 

I’m dropping you a note to let you know that there’s a small window of opportunity (till 4th May) to buy licences for  our SQA –endorsed intermediate ESOL course, ‘Journey 2 English’ at a substantial discount – up to 85%. The course is being used in a number of FE colleges and Councils throughout the UK.

 You can also pre-order the course many people have been asking us for – ‘Journey 2 Basic Skills’ which combines basic literacy, numeracy and English at beginner level – A1/A2.

You’ll find all the details on this link to our campaign: http://kck.st/2nDg62y
where you can help support the development of the beginners’ course and receive licences for the intermediate course to use now, in return. There’s even an option to have a bespoke promotional video for your college.

If you’d like further information, feel free to contact me by email: info@klik2learn.com

Thanks for reading this far!

Ann Attridge

Director, Klil2learn

Klik2Learn⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog




                                                                                
I spotted this company some years ago while working at SQA since then they have done well in establishing both a Scottish and an international footprint for their innovative English language learning materials  . Their voice recognition software to support English language acquisition and development is particularly innovative and effective. 

Ann the CEO has drawn my attention to their latest development. I think there are some real benefits to explore here for Colleges willing to partner with Klik2Learn. 

I think Colleges and ESOL training organisations across the UK will be interested in this. 

I'll let Ann explain the rest .... 


Hello, 

I’m dropping you a note to let you know that there’s a small window of opportunity (till 4th May) to buy licences for  our SQA –endorsed intermediate ESOL course, ‘Journey 2 English’ at a substantial discount – up to 85%. The course is being used in a number of FE colleges and Councils throughout the UK.

 You can also pre-order the course many people have been asking us for – ‘Journey 2 Basic Skills’ which combines basic literacy, numeracy and English at beginner level – A1/A2.

You’ll find all the details on this link to our campaign: http://kck.st/2nDg62y
where you can help support the development of the beginners’ course and receive licences for the intermediate course to use now, in return. There’s even an option to have a bespoke promotional video for your college.

If you’d like further information, feel free to contact me by email: info@klik2learn.com

Thanks for reading this far!

Ann Attridge

Director, Klil2learn

What I’ve been up to ;-)⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


I keep being asked what I've been up to,  or what I've been doing - here is a whistle stop tour of some of the highlights.  Thanks too to all my connections and friends across FE/HE/Schools and Work-based learning in Scotland , UK and internationally for harnessing my enthusiasm for learning and keeping me busy, by making full use of my breadth of experience,  expertise and network.

If you follow this blog  or keep up with my linkedIn profile or follow me on twitter you'll see what I get up to.  Learning and development is an open activity ;-).  You can still make a living outside but alongside the institutional atriums'.  I liked this post from an old friend  Eylan Ezekiel  on the  life of a freelancer.

There are still too many closed minds around, too many folks chained to the iron rice bowl, and not prepared to think out of the box or challenge the established orthodoxies or speak to those who wield power,  but who often have little understanding of skills delivery in FE and or the development needs and motivations of those who work in vocational training sector. These folks are often badly in need of sage advice.  You can break the chains, keep smiling and make a positive contribution. (Chained to the Iron rice bowl is analogous of prisoners within a system, who just keep their heads down no matter what changes are instigated as they know any challenge to the orthodoxy will cut off their food supply - this from a senior colleague still working within education policy circles)

Recent substantive assignments - I can't list them all here ...particularly all the events I've talked at or chaired over the last 18 months.

Whitepapers and webinars for international VLE suppliers to support entry in UK educational and vocational marketplaces. Example 

Evaluation of the  Socio and Economic Impact of Massive Open On-line Courses with recommendation for future development models ( client  global UK University with courses on Coursera, MitX , and Futurelearn) Enjoyed working for Edinburgh University.

Bid writing and partnership building for a public tender for national on-line testing system for schools (client global e-assessment provider in need of curriculum advice to tailor product for UK market)

Papers , Workshops and Advice developed and delivered  for JISC  for Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. This spanned - advice on creation processes to enable digitisation of the national occupational standards development process ,  advice the creation of trailblazer standards to ensure  that they are open to on-line and blended delivery , guidelines to encourage the  creation of assessment standards to encourage best use of digital technology in assessment delivery and quality assurance, suggestions on better use of data management and the on-line rather than paper certification of apprenticeships, this  for the UK Vocational Reform Programme in England. ( client Jisc) I do think we are missing some tricks around how to make best use of the Employer Levy in Scotland and will keep trying to be heard.



Advice too on the adoption of suitable new standards for digital literacy for learning, life and work. Based around the excellent work of Helen Beetham and Jisc and in line with the new essential skills framework developed in Wales. ( For various clients )

Identification of suitable international consultants for design and delivery of range of international vocational learning projects for a range of clients including large UK based awarding bodies for assignments in  Middle east , Africa , China and within Europe.(clients international consultancies and international awarding bodies)

Advice and support for organisations around the SCQF Credit and leveling and the sourcing of credit and leveling services. ( international awarding body)

Partnerships and introductions around content development , campus apps , the development of digital learning spaces and associated innovative thinking for relevant Colleges and training providers. ( range of providers and clients )

Workshops for senior management teams - trying to find routes ahead for service delivery and for staff development in an increasingly on-line and cloud based world of learning.( Colleges, training providers and in company sessions) I'd like to do more of these. There are far too few open practitioners in Scottish Further Education and it is a poor reflection of the innovation and great teaching practice that I know exists.

Pro Bono

I am enjoying the continued challenges :  as Board Member of Youthlink Scotland , ALT as Co-Chair in Scotland and  as a Board Member at  Glasgow's Kelvin College.

As Co-Founder of Open Scotland I continue to support any  initiative encouraging the open sharing of learning materials , collaborative learning  and the development of teaching staff and learners' digital skills and I am looking forward to contributing to Scottish Government's Information Literacy Community of Practice as an adviser.

This year I supported #oer17 and the UNESCO Global Consultation on #OER as a chair and contributor. Thanks to the generosity of ALT and UNESCO for their invitation and support..

I still feed  back where I can opportunities for  Scottish FE , to individual colleges and to organisations I have worked for in the sector. The focus needs to get back on to innovation in  life long learning.




It's been a fun 18 months and if you need to drive real change in your organisation  along with your staff ( driven with them not at them or over them ) and or have an interesting project that is around collaborating and improving the lot of learners in Scotland, UK or internationally and above all you are positive and fun to work with - I'm always on the look out for my next gig.

What I’ve been up to ;-)⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


I keep being asked what I've been up to,  or what I've been doing - here is a whistle stop tour of some of the highlights.  Thanks too to all my connections and friends across FE/HE/Schools and Work-based learning in Scotland , UK and internationally for harnessing my enthusiasm for learning and keeping me busy, by making full use of my breadth of experience,  expertise and network.

If you follow this blog  or keep up with my linkedIn profile or follow me on twitter you'll see what I get up to.  Learning and development is an open activity ;-).  You can still make a living outside but alongside the institutional atriums'.  I liked this post from an old friend  Eylan Ezekiel  on the  life of a freelancer.

There are still too many closed minds around, too many folks chained to the iron rice bowl, and not prepared to think out of the box or challenge the established orthodoxies or speak to those who wield power,  but who often have little understanding of skills delivery in FE and or the development needs and motivations of those who work in vocational training sector. These folks are often badly in need of sage advice.  You can break the chains, keep smiling and make a positive contribution. (Chained to the Iron rice bowl is analogous of prisoners within a system, who just keep their heads down no matter what changes are instigated as they know any challenge to the orthodoxy will cut off their food supply - this from a senior colleague still working within education policy circles)

Recent substantive assignments - I can't list them all here ...particularly all the events I've talked at or chaired over the last 18 months.

Whitepapers and webinars for international VLE suppliers to support entry in UK educational and vocational marketplaces. Example 

Evaluation of the  Socio and Economic Impact of Massive Open On-line Courses with recommendation for future development models ( client  global UK University with courses on Coursera, MitX , and Futurelearn) Enjoyed working for Edinburgh University.

Bid writing and partnership building for a public tender for national on-line testing system for schools (client global e-assessment provider in need of curriculum advice to tailor product for UK market)

Papers , Workshops and Advice developed and delivered  for JISC  for Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. This spanned - advice on creation processes to enable digitisation of the national occupational standards development process ,  advice the creation of trailblazer standards to ensure  that they are open to on-line and blended delivery , guidelines to encourage the  creation of assessment standards to encourage best use of digital technology in assessment delivery and quality assurance, suggestions on better use of data management and the on-line rather than paper certification of apprenticeships, this  for the UK Vocational Reform Programme in England. ( client Jisc) I do think we are missing some tricks around how to make best use of the Employer Levy in Scotland and will keep trying to be heard.



Advice too on the adoption of suitable new standards for digital literacy for learning, life and work. Based around the excellent work of Helen Beetham and Jisc and in line with the new essential skills framework developed in Wales. ( For various clients )

Identification of suitable international consultants for design and delivery of range of international vocational learning projects for a range of clients including large UK based awarding bodies for assignments in  Middle east , Africa , China and within Europe.(clients international consultancies and international awarding bodies)

Advice and support for organisations around the SCQF Credit and leveling and the sourcing of credit and leveling services. ( international awarding body)

Partnerships and introductions around content development , campus apps , the development of digital learning spaces and associated innovative thinking for relevant Colleges and training providers. ( range of providers and clients )

Workshops for senior management teams - trying to find routes ahead for service delivery and for staff development in an increasingly on-line and cloud based world of learning.( Colleges, training providers and in company sessions) I'd like to do more of these. There are far too few open practitioners in Scottish Further Education and it is a poor reflection of the innovation and great teaching practice that I know exists.

Pro Bono

I am enjoying the continued challenges :  as Board Member of Youthlink Scotland , ALT as Co-Chair in Scotland and  as a Board Member at  Glasgow's Kelvin College.

As Co-Founder of Open Scotland I continue to support any  initiative encouraging the open sharing of learning materials , collaborative learning  and the development of teaching staff and learners' digital skills and I am looking forward to contributing to Scottish Government's Information Literacy Community of Practice as an adviser.

This year I supported #oer17 and the UNESCO Global Consultation on #OER as a chair and contributor. Thanks to the generosity of ALT and UNESCO for their invitation and support..

I still feed  back where I can opportunities for  Scottish FE , to individual colleges and to organisations I have worked for in the sector. The focus needs to get back on to innovation in  life long learning.




It's been a fun 18 months and if you need to drive real change in your organisation  along with your staff ( driven with them not at them or over them ) and or have an interesting project that is around collaborating and improving the lot of learners in Scotland, UK or internationally and above all you are positive and fun to work with - I'm always on the look out for my next gig.

The Budget : The bits not reported in Scotland ! Vocational Reform.⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


Picture of Philip Hammond , Chancellor
CC/BY https://www.flickr.com/photos/mfa_lithuania/ 

Yesterday,  I read and heard various accounts of the Chancellor's budget in the Scottish media  . They all said that much of the budget focused on the national health service or educational reforms in England which were not of any consequence for the devolved administrations.

In fact,  we should be paying close attention to the vocational reform programme happening in England. There are some really interesting and challenging developments springing from it,  which should be shaping thinking in Scotland.

Here are some accounts from the English media

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/mar/08/t-levels-aim-to-improve-technical-education-and-improve-uk-productivity

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/39212506/t-levels-what-are-they

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/education/t-levels-will-work/

I've a live Google Doc that keeps an eye on these developments from a Scottish perspective which I will update later.

The main news announcements in England show the continued shifts in thinking around what are now being called the T-Levels or technology level qualifications in England.  The Chancellor announced an additional £50 Million investment in Further Education. This based on increasing the contact hours for 16-19 year olds in Colleges from 600 hours to 900 hours per year.
This will make College courses almost 9-5 programmes , as  previously highlighted they will also have an up to three month work placement embedded in them. This will be norm by 2022. Initially this funding appears to be going into developing the new system.

In Scotland FE programmes still sit around the 600 hour mark - we have many of the same challenges around retention and achievement and the work readiness of FE learners. The additional funding and the approach of extending the hours for these learners is something that should be given every consideration in Scotland.  This model is moving the training hours closer to the systems in Germany and other European states - which matches the rhetoric around the future of vocational learning in Scotland.

In 2018/19  there will also be an additional £40 Million invested in 'Life Long Learning' a term that is familiar to us in Scotland but has not been used in England for more than a decade. This to support adult literacy and numeracy and improve work based skills in line with the Industrial Strategy. The expectation being that a series of pilots will use digital technology to deliver new skills into the workplace. This part of developing plans around future skills and life long learning.  So worth too having a dig into this.

The English system is in an incredibly disjointed state  - but we should be learning the best lessons from it.

I hope the  Scottish media start doing a better job of covering this reform programme and its implications for Scottish learners.

If you work in Scottish Further Education or with a Scottish Training provider you should tune into the English vocational reform programme.


The Budget : The bits not reported in Scotland ! Vocational Reform.⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog


Picture of Philip Hammond , Chancellor
CC/BY https://www.flickr.com/photos/mfa_lithuania/ 

Yesterday,  I read and heard various accounts of the Chancellor's budget in the Scottish media  . They all said that much of the budget focused on the national health service or educational reforms in England which were not of any consequence for the devolved administrations.

In fact,  we should be paying close attention to the vocational reform programme happening in England. There are some really interesting and challenging developments springing from it,  which should be shaping thinking in Scotland.

Here are some accounts from the English media

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/mar/08/t-levels-aim-to-improve-technical-education-and-improve-uk-productivity

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/39212506/t-levels-what-are-they

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/education/t-levels-will-work/

I've a live Google Doc that keeps an eye on these developments from a Scottish perspective which I will update later.

The main news announcements in England show the continued shifts in thinking around what are now being called the T-Levels or technology level qualifications in England.  The Chancellor announced an additional £50 Million investment in Further Education. This based on increasing the contact hours for 16-19 year olds in Colleges from 600 hours to 900 hours per year.
This will make College courses almost 9-5 programmes , as  previously highlighted they will also have an up to three month work placement embedded in them. This will be norm by 2022. Initially this funding appears to be going into developing the new system.

In Scotland FE programmes still sit around the 600 hour mark - we have many of the same challenges around retention and achievement and the work readiness of FE learners. The additional funding and the approach of extending the hours for these learners is something that should be given every consideration in Scotland.  This model is moving the training hours closer to the systems in Germany and other European states - which matches the rhetoric around the future of vocational learning in Scotland.

In 2018/19  there will also be an additional £40 Million invested in 'Life Long Learning' a term that is familiar to us in Scotland but has not been used in England for more than a decade. This to support adult literacy and numeracy and improve work based skills in line with the Industrial Strategy. The expectation being that a series of pilots will use digital technology to deliver new skills into the workplace. This part of developing plans around future skills and life long learning.  So worth too having a dig into this.

The English system is in an incredibly disjointed state  - but we should be learning the best lessons from it.

I hope the  Scottish media start doing a better job of covering this reform programme and its implications for Scottish learners.

If you work in Scottish Further Education or with a Scottish Training provider you should tune into the English vocational reform programme.


Final call for #OER17: The Politics of Open. Registration closes 16 March 2017⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/scotland/ 
 
This makes a good follow up post to my last one on the
UNESCO #OER consultation - I do hope everyone knows that we are all on a journey to a world of much more open practice and collaborative learning . Though I am sure there are a few individuals and institutions who will be determined to keep their knowledge locked up. You'll be wearing a creative commons t-shirt in no time !

Open educational resources are important because they allow freedom of access and enhanced opportunities to learn for all.



https://oer17.oerconf.org

The #OER17 conference takes place in London on 5-6 April, it provides an ideal opportunity for anyone interested in learning more about open resources, policy and practice to connect with experts and enthusiasts. We welcome delegates from all sectors to come and share knowledge and experiences, network and learn. 
 
With keynotes from: Maha Bali, American University in Cairo; Lucy Crompton-Reid, Wikimedia UK; and Diana Arce, Activist Artist and Researcher, Germany, and plenary panel with Catherine Cronin, Laura Czerniewicz and Muireann O’Keeffe plus over 100 sessions from the open education community we hope it’s the open education event you can’t miss.
 
The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland. The conference themes this year are:
 
  • Local, national, and international policy and practice
  • Institutional/organisational politics
  • Participation & social equality
  • Open Party
 
Registration closes on the 16 March 2017 and tickets are available for single and two days. For more details visit https://oer17.oerconf.org/registration/
 

Final call for #OER17: The Politics of Open. Registration closes 16 March 2017⤴

from @ ...........Experimental Blog

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/scotland/ 
 
This makes a good follow up post to my last one on the
UNESCO #OER consultation - I do hope everyone knows that we are all on a journey to a world of much more open practice and collaborative learning . Though I am sure there are a few individuals and institutions who will be determined to keep their knowledge locked up. You'll be wearing a creative commons t-shirt in no time !

Open educational resources are important because they allow freedom of access and enhanced opportunities to learn for all.



https://oer17.oerconf.org

The #OER17 conference takes place in London on 5-6 April, it provides an ideal opportunity for anyone interested in learning more about open resources, policy and practice to connect with experts and enthusiasts. We welcome delegates from all sectors to come and share knowledge and experiences, network and learn. 
 
With keynotes from: Maha Bali, American University in Cairo; Lucy Crompton-Reid, Wikimedia UK; and Diana Arce, Activist Artist and Researcher, Germany, and plenary panel with Catherine Cronin, Laura Czerniewicz and Muireann O’Keeffe plus over 100 sessions from the open education community we hope it’s the open education event you can’t miss.
 
The conference will be chaired by social and educational technologist and Wikimedia UK Trustee Josie Fraser, and Alek Tarkowski, Director of Centrum Cyfrowe, co-founder and coordinator of Creative Commons Poland. The conference themes this year are:
 
  • Local, national, and international policy and practice
  • Institutional/organisational politics
  • Participation & social equality
  • Open Party
 
Registration closes on the 16 March 2017 and tickets are available for single and two days. For more details visit https://oer17.oerconf.org/registration/