Author Archives: Amy

Reach needs YOU – have your say in our survey⤴

from @ Reach

Hey you out there. Yes….you!

Pointing finger we need YOU

We would really appreciate your help.

Can you spare 5 mins to answer a few questions in our survey? Click here to take the survey.

We want to make sure that the Reach website is what young people like you actually want and need.

We will listen carefully to what you have to say, and will use what you tell us to shape the future of Reach.

Young person at computer dancing for joy

We will be entering all young people who complete the survey into a prize draw for Amazon Vouchers.

 THANK YOU SO MUCH – YOU’VE REALLY HELPED US TODAY.

The post Reach needs YOU – have your say in our survey appeared first on Reach.

Domestic abuse – it’s not your fault.⤴

from @ Reach

Domestic abuse is when a person hurts, bullies or takes away the choices of someone they have a close relationship with. Scottish Women’s Aid have lots of good advice for young people about domestic abuse if this is happening to you or someone you know:

You may feel scared, angry, upset, depressed, guilty or confused. Whatever you feel is OK. There are no right or wrong feelings. Domestic abuse is not your fault. The person who abuses is responsible – not you or anyone else.’

Check out this film in which young people who’ve been through it explain why talking about domestic abuse can help.

 

 

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Want to find out more about your rights? Check out the Launchpad game online⤴

from @ Reach

St. Patrick’s Primary School, a UNICEF partner school, in Coatbridge, in Glasgow, Scotland, on 27 March 2015.

Did you know that you have the right to the best possible childhood, where you are respected, listened to, well looked after, safe and happy?

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, or UNCRC for short, sets out what your rights are. When countries sign up to it, they’re promising to protect your rights and make sure you have what you need. Almost every country in the world has signed up, including the United Kingdom.

Want to find out more while having fun playing games online? Check out UNICEF’s Launchpad game to explore your rights and how to enjoy them.

The post Want to find out more about your rights? Check out the Launchpad game online appeared first on Reach.

“Everybody involved, nobody left out”⤴

from @ Reach

Nobody likes being left out at school. Whether it’s not getting the chance to join in with activities in the classroom, playground or sports field, feeling excluded or unsupported is just SO not what anyone needs.

The good news is that young people called the Young Ambassadors for Inclusion are on a mission to help schools think about how they can become more inclusive. They recently met up with Deputy First Minister and Education Secretary John Swinney to have their say about how important it is that ALL pupils – whatever their age, background, or support need – feel included in school.

Talking about what inclusion means to them and how to make sure pupils feel safe, accepted, and treated equally, the Young Ambassadors shared what matters to them the most:

“Everybody being included in education regardless of need”

“Making it easy for pupils to ask for help and offer the right support”

“Not being defined by any difficulties you have”

The young people thought that it was really important for schools to make sure that everyone understands and has a positive attitude about support needs like disabilities and mental health issues:

“Whole school awareness of additional support needs can support much better understanding and reduce stigma and isolation”.

And by ‘everyone’, the Ambassadors meant not just the pupils but the teachers as well – they told the Education Minister they think that all teachers should have training on inclusion and the different types of support needs pupils may have and how this might affect them in school.

“When staff have an understanding of different additional support needs and can understand certain behaviours, it helps them understand why young people may act in a particular way”

They had some good ideas for how to raise awareness, like holding pupil conferences, taking part in national awareness weeks, putting on school assemblies led by pupils, or developing awareness raising days about specific issues such as mental health or being LGBT.

The Inclusion Ambassadors said that it was really important for schools to make sure pupils with support needs had the same chance as other pupils to have a say in decisions:

“If school don’t support you to try things how will we ever get the chance?”

 “Support staff have ideas of what young people are good at or not good at. Don’t make assumptions.”

We need to create positive stories about pupils with additional support needs rather than focus on the negatives.”

Summing it all up perfectly one Ambassador told John Swinney:

“We want to be seen as individuals with our set of unique strengths and skills. 

So what next for the Inclusion Ambassadors?

After the success of their meeting with the Deputy First Minister, the Inclusion Ambassadors are creating a pledge that schools can use to show they are committed to inclusion. They are also going to make a support pack and short film for schools to raise awareness of inclusion and how important it is to listen to young people’s views.

 

 

The post “Everybody involved, nobody left out” appeared first on Reach.

What do YOU think of Reach….?⤴

from @ Reach

We want to make sure the Reach website is what young people like you actually want and need. So we’d like to hear what you think of it and your ideas about how we can make it better. 

When we were developing the website, we involved 75 young people from schools and youth groups across Scotland as youth advisors. They were complete legends! As well as helping us work out how best to reach young people and what our key messages should be, they also helped shape exactly what the website is like. One group that took part was the Scottish Youth Parliament’s Education and Lifelong Learning Committee. So how chuffed were we to we to get this lovely piece written by  MSYP Aqeel? Aqeel told us that the Scottish Youth Parliament even passed a motion in support of Reach!

We’re now planning lots more opportunities for young people to get involved with our work and help shape what Reach will look like in the future. Interested? Get in touch to find out how you could get involved, or just drop us an email to let us know what you think of the website…. What works? What’s rubbish? We want the whole picture….

 

  

The Scottish Youth Parliament’s Education and Lifelong Learning Committee want to thank Enquire for involving us when developing their brand new website. So what did we do? Well, other than complementing the excellent work of staff at Enquire who always go the extra mile to ensure young people have access to good quality information, we were involved in the site’s design. We were delighted to be able to inform aspects of the website such as the format, logos, the size, the layout and of course the lovely colours to make it all easily accessible and attractive to a young person’s eyes.

We think the website is not just a resource for those who are struggling with mental health or are being bullied. It’s a resource for all of Scotland’s young people; an advice service like no other. It has everything you want all on the same website! If you need exam advice, contacts for support organisations, are being bullying, or are having trouble with mental health, go visit reach.scot now, folks!

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A big thank you to Aqeel MSYP for sharing his thoughts on Reach.

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