Monthly Archives: November 2016

particle accelerators⤴

from @ fizzics

An electric field can be used to accelerate charged particles. Conservation of energy tells us that work done by the electric field = change in the particle’s kinetic energy The speed of the particle can be determined if its charge and the accelerating voltage (potential difference) are known.  The notes attached to the end of this post ... Read more

Career Education Standard 3-18: Weaving career education into the curriculum⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

ken-edwardsBy Ken Edwards, Education Programme Lead, Skills Development Scotland

Published in September 2015, the Standard addresses the ambition to reduce youth unemployment by better preparing young people for the world of work and is a direct response to one of the recommendations in Education Working for All! The standard reflects existing Curriculum for Excellence guidance; most obviously, in relation to Building the Curriculum 4: Skills for learning, life and work but also in delivering some of the health and wellbeing outcomes that are, of course, the responsibility of all.

At the heart of the new Standard lies a set of entitlements for all learners and a corresponding set of expectations for each of the four key influencers in young peoples’ learning and career choices: you as teachers or education practitioners; parents and carers; employers and, of course, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) the national skills agency.

I know from previous experience that the landscape of Scottish education can sometimes appear cluttered with seemingly unconnected new initiatives that compete for limited development time. Therefore, it’s heartening to know that as schools begin to deliver the entitlements and expectations described in this new Standard it will also help them address some of the other current priorities in Scottish education.

A significant body of research shows more systematic and progressive delivery of quality career education works on two fronts. Firstly it helps young people to develop the essential career management skills needed to successfully navigate the increasingly complex and extended transition from school into further learning, training or employment. Secondly, it has more immediate positive impacts by helping to set learning in a relevant real-life context so raising learners’ engagement and motivation. In turn, this leads to measurable improvements in achievement and attainment and makes a valuable contribution to closing the attainment gap. All of which are priorities in Scottish Government’s new National Improvement Framework.

Support for you

The Career Education Standard acknowledges and builds on the existing good practice seen in classrooms across Scotland and aspires to make this common practice in future.

Fortunately, with such an ambition, you are not alone in implementing the Standard. SDS and other partners are working hard to provide additional guidance and support to help you develop young people’s skills for life and work and so ensure that DYW sustainably improves learning experiences and outcomes for all.

SDS’s team of expert Careers Advisers have started working with pupils from an earlier stage; beginning at the point of transition from P7 to S1 and continuing to be involved at all stages until thesds-in-school-infographics-aw2 end of school. They offer a combination of group and one-to-one activities geared to developing the essential career management skills that help young people make informed learning and career choices providing a valuable complement to school career education programmes. We have been working in close collaboration with Education Scotland and a number of primary, secondary and additional support needs schools across Scotland to develop, test and refine this support.

We know young people are going online for information and help. Only last week Childwise figures showed 7-16 year olds are spending 3 hours a day on line, that’s up to 4.8 hours for 15 to 16 year olds. This growing trend coincides with the news that SDS’s digital resource is already being significantly enhanced, with more on the way. This includes the updated and more intuitive version of My World of Work, our award-winning careers information and advice web service, which launched on 25 January.

There will also be a new dedicated digital offer aimed at CfE second level (P5-7) and an exploration of how P7 pupils can best use My World of Work. These digital resources are accompanied by a range of support materials that can help teachers and pupils to better connect learning in and beyond the classroom to the world of work.

SDS is also working to enhance practitioners’ confidence and skills in the area of career education. We are working with Education Scotland to develop a suite of learning resources that will support career-long professional learning. These will be gradually rolled out over the coming months and will focus on getting to know the Standard, how to make effective use of My World of Work, career management skills and also an insight into career and labour market intelligence and how to access current information.

SDS will also be able to further support schools in engaging and working with employers, and along with the National Parent Forum of Scotland have already developed a guide for parents to career education in schools.

Coming up

Over the coming months you’ll hear more from my colleagues in SDS on each of these areas and the progress that’s being made.

In March we’ll update you on the launch of the re-developed My World of Work and the new and improved tools and content as well as plans for the future.’

Useful Links

Read the Career Education Standard

Find out more about Skills Development Scotland

Get the help you need for the career you want at My World of Work

See the National Parent Forum of Scotland nutshell guide Career Education: A World of Possibilities

Building the Curriculum 4

Education Working for All!

 

Making skills work and promoting apprenticeships⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

letitiaFrom As the national skills body, we, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) support the people and businesses of Scotland by delivering services that help them to achieve their ambitions.

With careers advisers in secondary schools and high street centres across the country, we are passionate about developing skills in the community and getting more young people into work.

We also support and promote work based learning and apprenticeships which offer young people the chance to get a job, get paid and get qualified.

As part of this promotion, we are working with employers, training providers and partners to co-ordinate events and activity throughout autumn to raise awareness of apprenticeships and the benefits of work based learning.

The Scottish Government’s Youth Employment Strategy and the aims of Developing the Young Workforce include reducing youth unemployment and bringing education and industry closer together.

To support this, young people in Dumfries and Galloway are encouraged find out more about apprenticeships at an upcoming SDS event taking place on Friday 25th at Easterbrook Hall.

Aimed at pupils from S2 to S4, this event will help inform pupils when making choices about their future. It provides  a great opportunity to hear real life experiences from apprentices as well as the chance to meet employers.  Young people will get an insight as to the benefits of apprenticeships and career opportunities provided by work based learning through exclusive demonstrations.

mohammadYou might not know but there are more than 25,500 new Modern Apprenticeship opportunities across Scotland each year, with over 80 different types available in hundreds of jobs!  From financial services and healthcare to construction and IT, each apprenticeship is developed by industry to suit their needs.    This means that apprentices can build valuable work experience from day one and gain an accredited qualification which is recognised by industry.

It’s worth noting that last year there were 765 Modern Apprenticeship starts in Dumfries and Galloway, up from 753 in 2014/15.

Apprenticeships provide an alternative route into the world of work, equipping young people with the skills they need to succeed. Foundation Apprenticeships mean you can also now start a Modern Apprenticeship at school.   With a Foundation Apprenticeship pupils in S5 can complete elements of a Modern Apprenticeship alongside their other studies, such as Nat5s or Highers.Foundation Apprenticeships take two years to complete with pupils spending part of the week out of school, getting hands-on experience at college and with a local employer in their chosen industry.

With a Foundation Apprenticeship they leave school with an industry-recognised qualification which is set at SCQF level 6 – the same level as a Higher.

And now Graduate Level Apprenticeships provide a new way into degree-level study for individuals who are currently employed, or who want to go straight into work.

Visit apprenticeships.scot  to find out all you need to know about apprenticeships and to search and apply for vacancies.

St Andrew’s Celebrations Sing-along⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-st-andrews-singalongGlow TV is excited to be celebrating St Andrew’s Day with a series of events starting with this singalong session with Maeve MacKinnon.

Maeve will be singing a great Scots song called Bear in the Woods, by the Singing Kettle and a Gaelic song entitled Orra Bhonna Bhonnagan. The words for both songs will be available on screen for everyone to join in in their classrooms!

Join us on Friday 25th November at 11am. Sign up and join us live in Glow TV – St Andrew’s Celebrations Sing-along.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

23 Things: Thing 13 Video⤴

from

So here’s a thing…. (thing…get it?) …. although I consume as much online video as the next person I don’t actually produce a great deal, though there are plenty of embarrassing videos of me on YouTube from various conferences and events. Recently however I did have to produce a couple of videos.  The first was this video for the ALT Learning Technologist of the Year Community Choice Awards earlier this autumn.  Although our media production colleagues here at the University did an excellent job of producing the video and stitching the content together, recording the film was a bit of a faff to say the least. Due to tight deadlines and people disappearing for summer vacations, Stuart Nicol and I ended up filming the clip ourselves using a camera balanced precariously on a stool on top of a table. We may have forgotten to turn the microphone on during the first take and we lost another take due to hopeless laughter.  Anyway, it was a bit of a hassle, so it’s no wonder we look a bit rabbit-in-the-headlights in the film :}

Fast forward a couple of months and I was asked to present a guest lecture for the University’s Introduction to Online Distance Learning course.  Because I was on leave in the Outer Hebrides the week I was scheduled to talk I offered to record my lecture instead.  This time I used MediaHopper, the University’s Kaltura based media management platform, to record my talk and I have to say I was very impressed.  Once I’d created my slides I was able to record my lecture on my own laptop which was incredibly convenient for me as I have to work from home two days a week owing to childcare responsibilities.  Everything worked perfectly and although it took over half-an-hour to upload the video file from my cranky home network, I was able to get the whole recording done and dusted in a few hours.  Sorted!  Unfortunately the MediaHopper embed code isn’t quite as effective and my slides don’t render properly when I embed the video in WordPress, however you can see the lecture complete with slides here: Open Education and Co-Creation.  And because it’s CC BY licensed you’re welcome to download and reuse it too ?

St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-scots-storytellingJoin us on Tuesday 29th November at 2pm as part of our St Andrew’s Day celebrations for an opportunity to hear Edinburgh’s Makar read from two translated books.

Christine De Luca currently holds the post of Edinburgh’s Makar (poet laureate). She grew up in Walls, Shetland, but has long been resident in Edinburgh. She writes in both English and Shetlandic, her native tongue. She has published six collections of poetry and one novel, and has been the recipient of many awards and prizes for her work. She is one of the founders of Hansel Co-operative Press which was established to promote literary and artistic work in Shetland and Orkney. In 2008 She has translated Roald Dahl’s novel George’s Marvellous Medicine into Shetlandic as Dodie’s Phenomenal Pheesic.

Join us live in Glow TV to her Christina reading ‘The Gruffalo’s Bairn’ and ‘Da Trow’.
Sign up and register to take part live – St Andrew’s Celebrations – Scots Storytelling.

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Open Archaeology and the Digital Cultural Commons⤴

from

When I joined the Board of Wikimedia UK earlier this year I was asked if I’d like to write a blog post for the Wikimedia UK Blog, this is the result….

Eilean Dhomhnaill,  Loch Olabhat by Richard Law, CC BB SA 2.0

Eilean Dhomhnaill, Loch Olabhat by Richard Law, CC BB SA 2.0

Although I’ve worked in open education technology for almost twenty years now, my original background is actually in archaeology.  I studied archaeology at the University of Glasgow in the late 1980s and later worked there as material sciences technician for a number of years. Along the way I worked on some amazing fieldwork projects including excavating Iron Age brochs in Orkney and the Outer Hebrides, Bronze Age wetland sites at Flag Fen, a rare Neolithic settlement at Loch Olabhat in North Uist, the Roman fort of Trimontium at Newstead in the Scottish Borders and prehistoric, Nabatean and Roman sites in the South Hauran desert in Jordan.  I still have a strong interest in both history and archaeology and, perhaps unsurprisingly, I’m a passionate advocate of opening access to our shared cultural heritage.

Archaeological field work and post excavation analysis generates an enormous volume of data including photographs, plans, notebooks and journals, topographic data, terrain maps, archaeometric data, artefact collections, soil samples, osteoarchaeology data, archaeobotanical data, zooarchaeological data, radio carbon data, etc, etc, etc.  The majority of this data ends up in university, museum and county archives around the country or in specialist archives such as Historic Environment Scotland’s Canmore archive and the Archaeology Data Service (ADS) at the University of York.  And while there is no question that the majority of this data is being carefully curated and archived for posterity, much of it remains largely inaccessible as it is either un-digitised, or released under restrictive or ambiguous licenses.

Cadbury Castle Post Ex c. 1992

Cadbury Castle Post Ex c. 1992

This is hardly surprising for older archives which are composed primarily of analogue data.  I worked on the reanalysis of the Cadbury Castle archive in the early 1990’s and can still remember trawling through hundreds of dusty boxes and files of plans, context sheets, finds records, correspondence, notebooks, etc. That reanalysis did result in the publication of an English Heritage monograph which is now freely available from the ADS but, as far as I’m aware, little if any, of the archive has been digitised.

Digitising the archives of historic excavations may be prohibitively expensive and of debatable value, however much of the data generated by fieldwork now is born digital. Archives such as Canmore and the ADS do an invaluable job of curating this data and making it freely available online for research and educational purposes.  Which is great, but it’s not really open.  Both archives use custom licenses rather than the more widely used Creative Commons licences.  It feels a bit uncharitable to be overly critical of these services because they are at least providing free access to curated archaeological data online.  Other services restrict access to public cultural heritage archives with subscriptions and paywalls.

Several key thinkers in the field of digital humanities have warned of the dangers of enclosing our cultural heritage commons and have stressed the need for digital archives to be open, accessible and reusable.

The Journal of Open Archaeology Data is one admirable example of an Open Access scholarly journal that makes all its papers and data sets freely and openly available under Creative Commons licenses, while endorsing the Panton Principles and using open, non-proprietary standards for all of its content. Internet Archaeology is another Open Access journal that publishes all its content under Creative Commons Attribution licences.  However it’s still just a drop in the ocean when one considers the vast quantity of archaeological data generated each year.  Archaeological data is an important component of our cultural commons and if even a small portion of this material was deposited into Wikimedia Commons, Wikidata, Wikipedia etc., it would help to significantly increase the sum of open knowledge.

Wikimedia UK is already taking positive steps to engage with the Culture sector through a wide range of projects and initiatives such as residencies, editathons, and the Wiki Loves Monuments competition, an annual event that encourages both amateur and professional photographers to capture images of the world’s historic monuments.  By engaging with archaeologists and cultural heritage agencies directly, and encouraging them to contribute to our cultural commons, Wikimedia UK can play a key role in helping to ensure that our digital cultural heritage is freely and openly available to all.

This post originally appeared on the Wikimedia UK Blog

Microcast 5: Choices⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7438.jpeg

Some thoughts about making choices about the software and systems you use, they may have hidden positives or negatives.

Featured image, iPhone screenshot, edited in snapseed

    It’s okay not to be okay. But it’s also okay to ask for help.⤴

    from @ Reach

    Growing up can be stressful and there are lots of things that might be worrying you. Seeme Scotland want you to know it’s ok to talk about how you are feeling, and although there might be some pretty big stuff going on in your life, it’s ok not to feel ok about it all.

    Have a look at their great new film and let someone know how you feel.

    Warning: There is some strong language in the film.


    The post It’s okay not to be okay. But it’s also okay to ask for help. appeared first on Reach.

    Career Education Standard 3 – 18: Suite of Learning Resources⤴

    from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

    A suite of learning resources are currently being produced to  career standardssupport professional  development related to career education.  These resources  will cover a variety of key themes such as labour market information, career management skills, enterprise and entrepreneurship, My world of Work etc. and relate this to Career Education Standard 3-18.

    Learning outcomes

    As a result of engaging with this learning you will have:

    • an understanding of the purpose and aim of the Career Education Standard (3 – 18) (CES);
    • an understanding of the part you are expected to play, along with partners, in the implementation of the CES;
    • an understanding of the entitlements for children and young people;
    • developed, through self-evaluation, your understanding of the CES expectations in relation to your current practice;
    • identified areas of the CES expectations for your professional learning; and
    • a plan to take forward manageable changes to your practice.

    Who is this learning for?

    The resources  contribute to professional learning for practitioners at all levels working with children and young people within early learning and childcare, primary, secondary, special schools, colleges, private training providers, third sector providers, social work, community learning and development and other specialist learning providers including secure and residential settings.

    Learning resources

    Learning Resource 1:  An Introduction to the Career Education Standard 3-18

    This resource introduces you to the standard, its context, purpose and expectations in a logical and manageable format. The materials include a self-evaluation tool and contain references to How good is our school? (4th Edition). Engaging with this professional learning resource will help you build on your existing practice.

    Downloads :

    The following resources are currently in development:

    • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Labour Market Information
    • Learning Resources 3:  An Introduction to Career Management Skills
    • Learning Resources 4:  An Introduction to my World of Work
    • Learning Resources 2:  An Introduction to Enterprise Education