Monthly Archives: November 2016

Digital Curiosity⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

IMG_7485.jpeg

maybe, in concert with an emphasis on making and collaborating and bug reporting and embracing other values of the open web, individuals can help reorient the cultural attitude toward technology away from entanglement and back to a place of enlightenment.

The Age of Entanglement – The Atlantic

Interesting Article. More grist for the ‘why we need to teach digital literacy and curiosity’ mill via @livedtime

Featured image Qsquare quantum pseudo-telepathy from flickr
Creative Commons — Attribution 2.0 Generic — CC BY 2.0

    My Leadership Story⤴

    from @ Learning Stuff About Stuff

    I have volunteered to "share my leadership journey" for ten minutes before leading a discussion with other middle leaders at a SCEL event in Edinburgh.  This blog post is a rehearsal of those ten minutes, and I would gratefully appreciate any constructive feedback.

    I have a leadership story rather than a leadership journey to share. This is the story I tell myself about how I got to where I am now as a leader, and about where I might go next. It is very subjective and selective. Nonetheless I think it is worth sharing, because this is the truth I inhabit. You also have stories you tell yourself, and you inhabit your stories every day of your professional life. It is sometimes easy to recognise these stories in others - the colleague who sees themselves as the victim of unreasonable burdens regardless of changing circumstances or another who sees themselves as blessed and lucky no matter what misfortunes befall them. It is much harder to identify the stories we tell ourselves, because we tend to see them not as stories but as "how things are". These stories have immense power to shape our motivations and actions. If we are willing to examine them critically, we may even be able to reshape them into more powerful, positive stories.

    Here's my story. It highlights the biographical moments which seem significant to me, and takes for granted my enduring desire to improve the lives of the young people of Scotland through education.

    As a young teacher, I had no interest in leadership. I thought leadership was synonymous with dominance and control. I wanted to do neither. My worldview was influenced by Buddhist and psycho-therapeutic ideas. I believed in human growth and human potential, not in command-and-control.

    I also thought promotion just meant less teaching and more administration (I was right about that!). And so I avoided anything I would have described as a leadership position for many years. I did, however, become a senior teacher with responsibility for ICT. But that wasn't leadership in my head, because I wasn't anyone's boss. During this period I began to blog and use Twitter, thanks to the work Don Ledingham, Ewan McIntosh, Louise Jones, David Gilmour, John Johnstone, Neil Winton, Kate Farrel, Ian Stuart and others were doing. They formed the core of my growing professional learning network. My horizons expanded beyond my room and the colleagues in my department. I participated in an early Teachmeet.

    Then eventually my PT announced his impending retirement, and I was faced with the possibility of having to work under a new PT who might be younger and less experienced than me. That didn't seem like it would be fun, so I decided to apply. I had a lot of support and encouragement via Twitter and my PLN, who convinced me to go for it. Ollie Bray was particularly supportive in terms of getting my application right. I remember being conscious at the time that I would have to really want it to get it, so I invested much time and energy in preparing over a 6 month period. During that time I began to read about leadership, and found, to my great surprise, that modern thinking about leadership actually resonated with my beliefs about human potential and the nurturing of human growth. This was a real turning point for me. I saw the possibility of being a leader whilst remaining true to myself - leading with integrity. I began to learn more about coaching.

    All I had to do now was to convince someone to give me a job. I had the great good fortune to work under a head teacher, Colin Sutherland, who saw potential in me, and he promoted me to PT.

    I loved being PT maths and did a great job (even if I say so myself!), and might have remained one for the rest of my career had East Lothian schools not restructured their departments into faculties. This meant that every PT had to reapply for their job. After my interview, one of the panel asked Colin "why isn't Robert a depute already?". When Colin told me this, it had a big effect on me. I began to believe I could make a difference on a bigger scale than one department. I applied for the flexible route to headship programme. This was the best CLPL I ever did. I was coached by Dorothy Hillsley, to whom I am eternally grateful.


    Four years later I was a depute head teacher, after one spell as an acting depute which ended with my failing to secure the permanent post. That hurt, but I learnt a lot, and came back more resilient and determined. I have my current head Lauren Rodger to thank for this: she didn't appoint me the first time, but she always supported and believed in me. I have now achieved the standard for Headship, am loving having the opportunity to make appoint difference at NBHS and more widely and aspire to headship - gies a job!

    So that's my story. 25 years condensed into a few paragraphs. Many failures, mistakes and moments of doubt along the way have been edited out. This can't possibly be the whole truth, and some of it may be entirely untrue. The causal links are far too simplistic and it paints me in an altogether too positive light. Small incidents are given perhaps unwarranted significance. It skips entirely any examination of the values which underpin my motivation to be involved in education. It's just a story, not the truth. But it is an (incomplete) approximation of the truth I inhabit. I think it's a good story, because it motivates me to keep learning and working hard. It also keeps me humble as it recognises the good luck and support of others which have helped me along the way. I'm keeping my eyes open for a better story.

    What's yours?

    My Leadership Story⤴

    from @ Learning Stuff About Stuff

    I have volunteered to "share my leadership journey" for ten minutes before leading a discussion with other middle leaders at a SCEL event in Edinburgh.  This blog post is a rehearsal of those ten minutes, and I would gratefully appreciate any constructive feedback.

    I have a leadership story rather than a leadership journey to share. This is the story I tell myself about how I got to where I am now as a leader, and about where I might go next. It is very subjective and selective. Nonetheless I think it is worth sharing, because this is the truth I inhabit. You also have stories you tell yourself, and you inhabit your stories every day of your professional life. It is sometimes easy to recognise these stories in others - the colleague who sees themselves as the victim of unreasonable burdens regardless of changing circumstances or another who sees themselves as blessed and lucky no matter what misfortunes befall them. It is much harder to identify the stories we tell ourselves, because we tend to see them not as stories but as "how things are". These stories have immense power to shape our motivations and actions. If we are willing to examine them critically, we may even be able to reshape them into more powerful, positive stories.

    Here's my story. It highlights the biographical moments which seem significant to me, and takes for granted my enduring desire to improve the lives of the young people of Scotland through education.

    As a young teacher, I had no interest in leadership. I thought leadership was synonymous with dominance and control. I wanted to do neither. My worldview was influenced by Buddhist and psycho-therapeutic ideas. I believed in human growth and human potential, not in command-and-control.

    I also thought promotion just meant less teaching and more administration (I was right about that!). And so I avoided anything I would have described as a leadership position for many years. I did, however, become a senior teacher with responsibility for ICT. But that wasn't leadership in my head, because I wasn't anyone's boss. During this period I began to blog and use Twitter, thanks to the work Don Ledingham, Ewan McIntosh, Louise Jones, David Gilmour, John Johnstone, Neil Winton, Kate Farrel, Ian Stuart and others were doing. They formed the core of my growing professional learning network. My horizons expanded beyond my room and the colleagues in my department. I participated in an early Teachmeet.

    Then eventually my PT announced his impending retirement, and I was faced with the possibility of having to work under a new PT who might be younger and less experienced than me. That didn't seem like it would be fun, so I decided to apply. I had a lot of support and encouragement via Twitter and my PLN, who convinced me to go for it. Ollie Bray was particularly supportive in terms of getting my application right. I remember being conscious at the time that I would have to really want it to get it, so I invested much time and energy in preparing over a 6 month period. During that time I began to read about leadership, and found, to my great surprise, that modern thinking about leadership actually resonated with my beliefs about human potential and the nurturing of human growth. This was a real turning point for me. I saw the possibility of being a leader whilst remaining true to myself - leading with integrity. I began to learn more about coaching.

    All I had to do now was to convince someone to give me a job. I had the great good fortune to work under a head teacher, Colin Sutherland, who saw potential in me, and he promoted me to PT.

    I loved being PT maths and did a great job (even if I say so myself!), and might have remained one for the rest of my career had East Lothian schools not restructured their departments into faculties. This meant that every PT had to reapply for their job. After my interview, one of the panel asked Colin "why isn't Robert a depute already?". When Colin told me this, it had a big effect on me. I began to believe I could make a difference on a bigger scale than one department. I applied for the flexible route to headship programme. This was the best CLPL I ever did. I was coached by Dorothy Hillsley, to whom I am eternally grateful.


    Four years later I was a depute head teacher, after one spell as an acting depute which ended with my failing to secure the permanent post. That hurt, but I learnt a lot, and came back more resilient and determined. I have my current head Lauren Rodger to thank for this: she didn't appoint me the first time, but she always supported and believed in me. I have now achieved the standard for Headship, am loving having the opportunity to make appoint difference at NBHS and more widely and aspire to headship - gies a job!

    So that's my story. 25 years condensed into a few paragraphs. Many failures, mistakes and moments of doubt along the way have been edited out. This can't possibly be the whole truth, and some of it may be entirely untrue. The causal links are far too simplistic and it paints me in an altogether too positive light. Small incidents are given perhaps unwarranted significance. It skips entirely any examination of the values which underpin my motivation to be involved in education. It's just a story, not the truth. But it is an (incomplete) approximation of the truth I inhabit. I think it's a good story, because it motivates me to keep learning and working hard. It also keeps me humble as it recognises the good luck and support of others which have helped me along the way. I'm keeping my eyes open for a better story.

    What's yours?

    Foodvent 2016- It’s here!⤴

    from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

    foodvent-2016

    Explore a fun and exciting way to engage learners about Food & Health with our Foodvent calendar.

    The calendar has been developed by Food Partners from all over Scotland and is supported by teachers currently undergoing the GTCS accredited Good Food Champions course run by RHET

    Ok, how do we take part?

    • Learners and educators can start ‘opening’ windows from December 1st (when else?) at  http://bit.ly/foodvent 
    • Educators should look out for the teachers’ notes link near the top of the page
    • If you are a Glow user, please join the Good Food Learning Yammer group at any time
    • Do please spread the word about Foodvent 2016
    Need your Glow details reset? - How do get a Glow login?
    
    Log in with your Glow email address below to access the Yammer group


     

    The Learning Classroom or more of the same?⤴

    from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

    I have recently been revisiting a book first published in 2008 by Brian Boyd who was then a professor of education at Strathclyde University in Glasgow. This is 'The Learning Classroom' in which Boyd tried to set out conditions needed for teachers to be able to create a classroom that would really facilitate and promote learning at its core. Boyd looked at a range of evidence and research available at that time around what the best 'learning classroom' could, or should, look like. He recognised that this would be by no means a definitive descriptor and he was already anticipating the impact of new technologies, research and pedagogies and how these would develop the 'learning classroom' further. He was also perhaps recognising the continuous process of school and individual development, and the on-going necessity for continuous career-long professional learning.

    He suggested, similar to Howard Gardiner's multiple-intelligences theory, that there could be well be different types of classroom that teachers might need to create, and move between, depending on personal, local and national contexts. These types of classroom included, the formative, the thinking, the motivated, the democratic, the enterprising, and so on. Boyd writes about each of these in some detail, but perhaps he used this construct to merely aid his dissection of what types of activities helped make classrooms truly 'learning' ones which used a range of pedagogies and approaches to help all learners learn.

    In his concluding chapter Boyd lays out what he identifies as the key ten principles of the learning classroom. The first of these is the importance of relationships. A classroom culture built on mutual respect and sound inter-personal values were crucial to supporting learning. Teachers also need to understand learning and the causes of underperformance, and have an extensive range of strategies to support pupil learning and help them be successful learners. It is worth noting here that Boyd was one of the original architects of Scotland's Curriculum For Excellence, and this is reflected throughout this work. The second principle was around assessment. He recognised that assessment use could be for learning, of learning and as learning.  The importance of Black and Wilian's 'Inside The Black Box' which was a key driver in pedagogical development in Scotland at the time of publication. In the learning classroom teachers would thoroughly understand formative assessment theory and practice and use this to ensure learners were active participants in their learning. There was no mention of standardised testing as a key principle. The learning classroom should encourage, promote and allow time and space, for deep thinking. This was about metacognition in learners, to better help them understand and improve their own thinking. It was also vital that teachers should be good models of thinking individuals. Engagement was also key. Not only should teachers have the highest expectations of all learners, it was vital that they created the conditions and challenges necessary to engage those learners. Such engagement could be facilitated by collaborative working, across both disciplines and sectors, and by the provision of engaging and new learning opportunities. Participation was the next principle Boyd considered. This would be facilitated by moving away from more 'coverage' and instead seeking to promote depth in learning, with this being facilitated by allowing learners more time to deepen their understanding. Pupil responsibility was another principle. Pupils needed to be encouraged to be active paticipants  in their learning, with an ultimate aim of creating true 'learner autonomy' and independence. Such learning would be facilitated through collaboration with peers and others. We should have no labels, where pupils are labelled according to prior learning and perceived ability levels. He identified the problems with 'setting'  and felt this had no place in the true learning classroom. Such a classroom would support and promote pupil dialogue and collaboration. He referred to the work of Vygotsky which identified learning as a social process facilitated by dialogue, questioning, team-work, debate and argument. All of these strategies would help our learners become critical thinkers. Of course  the learning classroom would be characterised by intelligence at all levels. Already he was recognising and touching on the work that was to follow from Carol Dweck around mindsets. He still felt that too many teachers and students had fixed mindsets and still saw intelligence as fixed. This position needed to be challenged and continue to disappear from our classrooms. His final principle was about the importance of making connections. He felt that schools and teachers could still be a little divorced from the real world and we were not good at making the connection between the learning in school and real life. when learners could see those connections, learning and understanding was facilitated and deepened.

    Brian Boyd first penned these observations almost nine years ago. He certainly tapped into the Zeitgeist of the time and his work was informed by many leading thinkers and their research that was then emerging. I would argue the case he makes is still a strong and valid one, but we are not there yet. As he points out in his conclusion, many of the researchers he quotes have visited Scotland and spoke about their research and insights. These have been shared with system leaders and government, and there was a period where we may have thought our practice and systems might change as a result. Now I am not so sure. It seems we are still hell bent of travelling a route that flies in the face of such expertise and insights. More of the same, with the same depressing results for learners and learning, seem to be heading our way once again. Lets hope I am wrong!

    The Learning Classroom or more of the same?⤴

    from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

    I have recently been revisiting a book first published in 2008 by Brian Boyd who was then a professor of education at Strathclyde University in Glasgow. This is 'The Learning Classroom' in which Boyd tried to set out conditions needed for teachers to be able to create a classroom that would really facilitate and promote learning at its core. Boyd looked at a range of evidence and research available at that time around what the best 'learning classroom' could, or should, look like. He recognised that this would be by no means a definitive descriptor and he was already anticipating the impact of new technologies, research and pedagogies and how these would develop the 'learning classroom' further. He was also perhaps recognising the continuous process of school and individual development, and the on-going necessity for continuous career-long professional learning.

    He suggested, similar to Howard Gardiner's multiple-intelligences theory, that there could be well be different types of classroom that teachers might need to create, and move between, depending on personal, local and national contexts. These types of classroom included, the formative, the thinking, the motivated, the democratic, the enterprising, and so on. Boyd writes about each of these in some detail, but perhaps he used this construct to merely aid his dissection of what types of activities helped make classrooms truly 'learning' ones which used a range of pedagogies and approaches to help all learners learn.

    In his concluding chapter Boyd lays out what he identifies as the key ten principles of the learning classroom. The first of these is the importance of relationships. A classroom culture built on mutual respect and sound inter-personal values were crucial to supporting learning. Teachers also need to understand learning and the causes of underperformance, and have an extensive range of strategies to support pupil learning and help them be successful learners. It is worth noting here that Boyd was one of the original architects of Scotland's Curriculum For Excellence, and this is reflected throughout this work. The second principle was around assessment. He recognised that assessment use could be for learning, of learning and as learning.  The importance of Black and Wilian's 'Inside The Black Box' which was a key driver in pedagogical development in Scotland at the time of publication. In the learning classroom teachers would thoroughly understand formative assessment theory and practice and use this to ensure learners were active participants in their learning. There was no mention of standardised testing as a key principle. The learning classroom should encourage, promote and allow time and space, for deep thinking. This was about metacognition in learners, to better help them understand and improve their own thinking. It was also vital that teachers should be good models of thinking individuals. Engagement was also key. Not only should teachers have the highest expectations of all learners, it was vital that they created the conditions and challenges necessary to engage those learners. Such engagement could be facilitated by collaborative working, across both disciplines and sectors, and by the provision of engaging and new learning opportunities. Participation was the next principle Boyd considered. This would be facilitated by moving away from more 'coverage' and instead seeking to promote depth in learning, with this being facilitated by allowing learners more time to deepen their understanding. Pupil responsibility was another principle. Pupils needed to be encouraged to be active paticipants  in their learning, with an ultimate aim of creating true 'learner autonomy' and independence. Such learning would be facilitated through collaboration with peers and others. We should have no labels, where pupils are labelled according to prior learning and perceived ability levels. He identified the problems with 'setting'  and felt this had no place in the true learning classroom. Such a classroom would support and promote pupil dialogue and collaboration. He referred to the work of Vygotsky which identified learning as a social process facilitated by dialogue, questioning, team-work, debate and argument. All of these strategies would help our learners become critical thinkers. Of course  the learning classroom would be characterised by intelligence at all levels. Already he was recognising and touching on the work that was to follow from Carol Dweck around mindsets. He still felt that too many teachers and students had fixed mindsets and still saw intelligence as fixed. This position needed to be challenged and continue to disappear from our classrooms. His final principle was about the importance of making connections. He felt that schools and teachers could still be a little divorced from the real world and we were not good at making the connection between the learning in school and real life. when learners could see those connections, learning and understanding was facilitated and deepened.

    Brian Boyd first penned these observations almost nine years ago. He certainly tapped into the Zeitgeist of the time and his work was informed by many leading thinkers and their research that was then emerging. I would argue the case he makes is still a strong and valid one, but we are not there yet. As he points out in his conclusion, many of the researchers he quotes have visited Scotland and spoke about their research and insights. These have been shared with system leaders and government, and there was a period where we may have thought our practice and systems might change as a result. Now I am not so sure. It seems we are still hell bent of travelling a route that flies in the face of such expertise and insights. More of the same, with the same depressing results for learners and learning, seem to be heading our way once again. Lets hope I am wrong!

    Getting our heads above the clouds⤴

    from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

    My drive to and from work each day is about 40 minutes each way. During that drive, on very quiet Scottish country roads, I often think about the working day ahead, or consider the working day that has just ended. I have always found it useful to mull over the up-coming events of the day, when I know what these are, and also to unwind and divest myself of the issues that have occupied my attention during the day. Both useful strategies for headteacher well-being and allowing me to switch off and unwind at the end of very busy days. The fact that the countryside I drive through each day is absolutely stunning in no small way helps me gather my thoughts and keep a perspective. The rolling hills of Southern Scotland one way, and the majesty of the Cumbrian Fells and Lake District the other, mark the skyline of my journey. I am a lucky person, with a dream job and a dream drive to and from it.

    This week my journey has been marked by frost, ice and mist. The first bite of winter has seen temperatures plummet to a very chilly -7 degrees centigrade. Not always are my thoughts occupied by the immediacy of my own role, often they range further afield and today was one of those days.

    As I drove home this afternoon the hills were shrouded in mist and fog, with the tops of some just managing to appear above the blanket of dense opaque water vapour. On this drive home, and in this scenery, I began to think of metaphors for where we are currently in Scottish education. Like my own immediate journey, we face a journey of ups and downs and twists and turns in education. Perhaps, like many a day on my trip, we may think this is very familiar and we have been here before. The sudden appearance of deer, sheep, badgers and foxes on the road ahead may represent some of  the personalities we might come across on our own journey?

    The deer could be those fleet footed but flighty souls, who are a bit jumpy and don't stay in one place for very long. Then there are the blind followers of the sheep, who are always looking for someone else to take the lead, often following unthinking and plodding along behind the leader. We also may recognise colleagues who only appear at dawn or dusk and then disappear for the rest of the day, badger like. They can still can still give a a nasty bite to the unwary. Then there are the cunning, fox like, individuals, who know how to survive and make the most out of the system, always assuming they avoid the 'hounds' of QIOs, Inspectors and senior managers hell bent on holding them to account. Every day I see a whole host of birds, owls and buzzards in particular. The owls of course have seen it all before. They take their time before coming to a considered decision and are not renowned for fleetness of movement or high energy levels. They don't miss much though. The buzzards are the high fliers. They take to the skies and soar above everyone else. Often alone and aloof they look down on everyone else, as they scan the horizon for the next big, or little, thing.

    Seeing the hills which were poking their heads above the cloud base made me think about the individuals in the system who are often invisible and unsung most of the time, but now and again manage to get their heads above the fog of everything they are told to do, as they try to have their voice heard. Such are the people you find on Twitter, and the people you who might attend Teechmeets and Pedagoo events on a Saturday. There, not because someone had told them or paid them to be there, but because they want to be there because of their passion and commitment to their role and the profession. They are using their voice to contribute to system leadership and development and are not there because their job title indicates that perhaps they should be. They care.

    Such events on Saturdays, or after school, are a chance to engage with others who also need their fix of collaborative energy and to breathe the fresh air of unfettered and prescribed professional and personal development, shaped to match their own values and context and not somebody else's model of what education should look like. Recognise yourself or any of your colleagues in any of this? Tomorrow, I will be getting my fix of such collaborative energy as I attend an Enquiry meet in Edinburgh. Probably won't see any deer, sheep, foxes or badgers there. There will be plenty of colleagues, like myself, just trying to get our heads above the clouds of the day job to see the possibility of what could and can be. I might even see you there!

    Getting our heads above the clouds⤴

    from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

    My drive to and from work each day is about 40 minutes each way. During that drive, on very quiet Scottish country roads, I often think about the working day ahead, or consider the working day that has just ended. I have always found it useful to mull over the up-coming events of the day, when I know what these are, and also to unwind and divest myself of the issues that have occupied my attention during the day. Both useful strategies for headteacher well-being and allowing me to switch off and unwind at the end of very busy days. The fact that the countryside I drive through each day is absolutely stunning in no small way helps me gather my thoughts and keep a perspective. The rolling hills of Southern Scotland one way, and the majesty of the Cumbrian Fells and Lake District the other, mark the skyline of my journey. I am a lucky person, with a dream job and a dream drive to and from it.

    This week my journey has been marked by frost, ice and mist. The first bite of winter has seen temperatures plummet to a very chilly -7 degrees centigrade. Not always are my thoughts occupied by the immediacy of my own role, often they range further afield and today was one of those days.

    As I drove home this afternoon the hills were shrouded in mist and fog, with the tops of some just managing to appear above the blanket of dense opaque water vapour. On this drive home, and in this scenery, I began to think of metaphors for where we are currently in Scottish education. Like my own immediate journey, we face a journey of ups and downs and twists and turns in education. Perhaps, like many a day on my trip, we may think this is very familiar and we have been here before. The sudden appearance of deer, sheep, badgers and foxes on the road ahead may represent some of  the personalities we might come across on our own journey?

    The deer could be those fleet footed but flighty souls, who are a bit jumpy and don't stay in one place for very long. Then there are the blind followers of the sheep, who are always looking for someone else to take the lead, often following unthinking and plodding along behind the leader. We also may recognise colleagues who only appear at dawn or dusk and then disappear for the rest of the day, badger like. They can still can still give a a nasty bite to the unwary. Then there are the cunning, fox like, individuals, who know how to survive and make the most out of the system, always assuming they avoid the 'hounds' of QIOs, Inspectors and senior managers hell bent on holding them to account. Every day I see a whole host of birds, owls and buzzards in particular. The owls of course have seen it all before. They take their time before coming to a considered decision and are not renowned for fleetness of movement or high energy levels. They don't miss much though. The buzzards are the high fliers. They take to the skies and soar above everyone else. Often alone and aloof they look down on everyone else, as they scan the horizon for the next big, or little, thing.

    Seeing the hills which were poking their heads above the cloud base made me think about the individuals in the system who are often invisible and unsung most of the time, but now and again manage to get their heads above the fog of everything they are told to do, as they try to have their voice heard. Such are the people you find on Twitter, and the people you who might attend Teechmeets and Pedagoo events on a Saturday. There, not because someone had told them or paid them to be there, but because they want to be there because of their passion and commitment to their role and the profession. They are using their voice to contribute to system leadership and development and are not there because their job title indicates that perhaps they should be. They care.

    Such events on Saturdays, or after school, are a chance to engage with others who also need their fix of collaborative energy and to breathe the fresh air of unfettered and prescribed professional and personal development, shaped to match their own values and context and not somebody else's model of what education should look like. Recognise yourself or any of your colleagues in any of this? Tomorrow, I will be getting my fix of such collaborative energy as I attend an Enquiry meet in Edinburgh. Probably won't see any deer, sheep, foxes or badgers there. There will be plenty of colleagues, like myself, just trying to get our heads above the clouds of the day job to see the possibility of what could and can be. I might even see you there!