Monthly Archives: August 2015

FGM – A Statement Opposing Female Genital Mutilation⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

FGMFGM is a crime in Scotland and throughout the UK. It is also a crime for a person to carry out, assist or arrange the FGM of another person, even if the actual mutilation occurs outside Scotland.

Posters are available to outline the Scottish Government’s position on FGM. These are available to download in Arabic, English, French, Somali, and Swahili.

More information and details about support is outlined in the posters. Or, for more information, go to www.fgmaware.org

What it means to be visionary⤴

from @ Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Education

I'm working on a project where we're trying to inspire engineers to think beyond improving the existing objects and services in our world, and invent what we don't even know we don't even know yet. We're getting them to bump into their own unknown unknowns

This Steve Jobs video, above, is from 1997, where he describes in anecdote how he has created, over the seven prior years, what we know today as cloud computing. And yet, even today, there are plenty of institutions that struggle with the notion of putting everything "up there", where it is faster to access and safe(r) from loss. 

So the question is this: do you want to be a visionary, or follow one for an exciting ride, or be around nearly twenty years later questioning the vision of those who went off and did it? 

What it means to be visionary⤴

from @ Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Education

I'm working on a project where we're trying to inspire engineers to think beyond improving the existing objects and services in our world, and invent what we don't even know we don't even know yet. We're getting them to bump into their own unknown unknowns

This Steve Jobs video, above, is from 1997, where he describes in anecdote how he has created, over the seven prior years, what we know today as cloud computing. And yet, even today, there are plenty of institutions that struggle with the notion of putting everything "up there", where it is faster to access and safe(r) from loss. 

So the question is this: do you want to be a visionary, or follow one for an exciting ride, or be around nearly twenty years later questioning the vision of those who went off and did it? 

Thank you Paul!⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

It’s now over four years since we first launched Pedagoo.org! Before we were Pedagoo, we were Education Futures: Scotland on a free WordPress site with a few keen founding members. When we came up with the Pedagoo name we decided to go for a properly hosted site, but how would we host it with no […]

Wigtown Scots Tour⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

Wigtown Primary School is taking part in a very exciting Scots Language project. As part of the Wigtown Book Festival, Mrs Steele’s Rhinos (Primary 6/7 class) are devising and recording an audio tour of their town in Scots. Vistiors to the festival will be able to borrow iPods with the tour to gain a unique insight into the braw wee toun.

The weans have been working hard already on the project, which was the brainchild of Yvonne Caddell, Wigtown Book Festival’s Young People’s Portfolio Manager. I had the very great pleasure of doing an introductory session on Scots as Scots Language Co-ordinator. In the afternoon we gathered knowledge which the learners already had, using Scots for the whole day. We were ably assisted by Yvonne, class teacher Mrs Steele and Scots Language Ambassador for the school, Robert McQuistan. We also benefitted from the local knowledge of Stewart Anderson, another Ambassador who is waiting for a partner school.

The project continues with the ongoing support of this excellent team, with local experts on history (Donna Brewster) and wildlife (Ann Todd) also having input with the weans, hopefully answering many of the questions they have about their town. Kenny Barr will suport the recording of the final tour.

It is wonderful to see such enthusiasm from everyone involved. The Gallowa Scots is super braw tae! Good luck Rhinos! Haud gaun!Wigtown Rhinos

Feedback-what they say⤴

from @ JDMcDsblog

David Didau:

” approximately 70% of the feedback given by teachers to students is not ‘received’. That is to say, the students either don’t read it, don’t understand it, and don’t act on it.

Some of the reasons for this might be:
•Feedback is most often accepted when it confirms existing beliefs; where beliefs are challenged, feedback is often rejected
•If you give feedback to the whole class students think it must be directed at someone else and no one ‘receives’ it.
•Students often find teachers’ feedback to be “confusing, non-reasoned and not understandable” (Hattie 2009)
•Even when they do understand, they’re not sure how to apply it to their learning
•Most feedback is related to tasks rather than processes – that is to say it tends to focus on what was done rather than how it was done.

 

Prof Hattie

 

“Hattie suggests that feedback needs to be: ‘just in time’, ‘just for me’, ‘just where I am in my learning process’, and ‘just what I need to help me make progress’. According to his research into Effect Sizes, Feedback has the highest score.  Hattie has made clear that ‘feedback’ includes telling students what they have done well (positive reinforcement), and what they need to do to improve (corrective work, targets etc). This means that giving students assessment criteria for example would be included in ‘feedback’. This may seem odd, but high quality feedback is always given against explicit criteria, and so these would be included in ‘feedback’ experiments.

As well as feedback on the task Hattie believes that students can get feedback on the processes they have used to complete the task, and on their ability to self-regulate their own learning. All these have the capacity to increase achievement. Feedback on the ‘self’ such as ‘well done you are good at this’ is not helpful. Feedback must be informative rather than evaluative.

 

Durham University

“One of the most effective uses of a teacher’s time is in giving good feedback – which should be sparing, specific and encouraging.

It is “more important to give feedback about what is right than what is wrong,” the researchers say. It is also best to praise a particular task that has been accomplished well rather than praise a pupil as an individual with phrases like “good girl”.

 

Edmund Burke on the role of the MP⤴

from @ JDMcDsblog

Reading the biography of Edmund Burke, the Anglo Irish Whig philosopher and politician, by Jesse Norman MP. I like the address that the gave to the constituents of Bristiol, who had elected him in 1774. It defends the rights of MPs to make their own minds up, and not to be mere delegates, to be concerned with general matters, not justy the local and peronsal ones.
Here is an extract:

“I am sorry I cannot conclude without saying a word on a topic touched upon by my worthy colleague. I wish that topic had been passed by at a time when I have so little leisure to discuss it. But since he has thought proper to throw it out, I owe you a clear explanation of my poor sentiments on that subject.

Certainly, gentlemen, it ought to be the happiness and glory of a representative to live in the strictest union, the closest correspondence, and the most unreserved communication with his constituents. Their wishes ought to have great weight with him; their opinion, high respect; their business, unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasures, his satisfactions, to theirs; and above all, ever, and in all cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But his unbiassed opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you, to any man, or to any set of men living. These he does not derive from your pleasure; no, nor from the law and the constitution. They are a trust from Providence, for the abuse of which he is deeply answerable. Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.

… But government and legislation are matters of reason and judgment, and not of inclination; and what sort of reason is that, in which the determination precedes the discussion; in which one set of men deliberate, and another decide; and where those who form the conclusion are perhaps three hundred miles distant from those who hear the arguments?

To deliver an opinion, is the right of all men; that of constituents is a weighty and respectable opinion, which a representative ought always to rejoice to hear; and which he ought always most seriously to consider. But authoritative instructions; mandates issued, which the member is bound blindly and implicitly to obey, to vote, and to argue for, though contrary to the clearest conviction of his judgment and conscience,–these are things utterly unknown to the laws of this land, and which arise from a fundamental mistake of the whole order and tenor of our constitution.

Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates; but parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices, ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole. You choose a member indeed; but when you have chosen him, he is not member of Bristol, but he is a member of parliament. If the local constituent should have an interest, or should form an hasty opinion, evidently opposite to the real good of the rest of the community, the member for that place ought to be as far, as any other, from any endeavour to give it effect.

Royal Society of Edinburgh on Education in Scotland⤴

from @ JDMcDsblog

The Royal Society remains concerned at the lack of evaluation of Curriculum for Excellence. In it briefing notes, December 2014 it says,

“The absence of a systematic programme of independent evaluation of CfE has been a long-standing and key concern of the RSE Education

Committee, and that, ” high quality evaluation of CfE must relate to the aims of the reforms and the criticisms to which the reforms have been subjected.

It should seek to identifywhat is different about CfE and consider the extent towhich the distinctive and innovative features of the reforms are being reflected

in classroom practice.”

Professor Sally Brown goes on to observe that, ”

The RSE has been particularly concerned about the lack of a systematic strategy for development and implementation of CfE. Such a strategy would be expected to cover the identification of strategic goals, design and planning of the reforms; pilot work to test alternative courses of action; and independent evaluation. CfE has suffered profoundly from a lack of pilot trials and independent evaluation. In our view, problems have tended to be dealt with in isolation, with many different groups having been formed to give advice on particular aspects of the developments. This has made it very difficult to manage the system as a whole, and has, we believe, been the major cause of increased teacher workload.

.

 

 

Trash Trek – The Ultimate STEM Challenge⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

FLLicon_RGB_2011We’re not talking trash – we’re cleaning it up!

Announcing the 2015 FIRST LEGO League! Teams of children aged 9 to 16 are invited to explore the fascinating world of waste, from collection and sorting to smart production and reuse. Build and program a LEGO robot to tackle the Trash Trek missions, invent a solution to the world’s problem of waste, and present it at your regional tournament.

imagesCADLUI3SIt’s easy for schools, organisations or groups of friends to take part. Register now!

Tournaments in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Dundee and St Andrews. Training for teachers and coaches included. Bursaries available.

please see attached flyer for more info

TrashTrek