Monthly Archives: September 2011

Lightbulb moment⤴

from @ Caroline Gibson's Weblog

I’ve just had a bit of a eureka moment – at least I hope that’s what it will turn out to be.

I was flicking through blogs, having recently found this one: http://libertonheadsblog.blogspot.com/ (as recommended by Ollie Bray years ago; I was looking at his SQH blog posts) and again a couple of years ago the author Dj MacDonald had linked to a video on You Tube as recommended by Ewan McIntosh about children copying what adults do.  That was interesting and well done but of course then I started looking at other commercials etc and saw an upsetting picture of a child.  I couldn’t even bear to watch the video – one image is more than enough to set me off but it got me thinking!

Just yesterday I had, for some random reason, being wondering if there was anything I would regret I didn’t get the chance to do before I died.  Previously I have always been quite insular in what I have thought, usually did I get to travel to and explore all the places in the world I wanted to, did I climb enough mountains, run enough races etc.  I was thinking yesterday would I regret if I never got a faster marathon faster time, never qualified for Boston, never got a sub-24 hour west highland way race time (bit of a pattern here), didn’t do everything in my career I wanted to and would I regret it if I didn’t have kids.

Then I saw this picture tonight and realised what I believe and hope I would certainly regret when I died if I didn’t do it and that is to at least keep trying to make a difference in the lives of some kids that don’t have the same opportunities and life chances as most of the children I know. 

As we talked in my first SQH day last month about what our values in education are and what our vision is someone commented that I was looking for utopia and I suppose that probably is what I want – something that seems so unobtainable and impossible that it is not even worth trying.  And yet we have to keep hoping and trying that we can make a difference.

I quite firmly believe that doling out charity is not the way to solve this issue long term, although I do want to do some more research to find out which charities are most beneficial to support and of course in the case of the current crisis in the Horn of Africa immediate aid is needed to ensure people’s survival.

One way I hope I am making a tiny difference is with the link school in Malawi, both the one that has been going for 3 years and the one I am hoping to set up when I go out again next week.  That has been about developing learning and teaching and management skills in Malawi and the friendship and partnership between both schools.  However it has also been about raising awareness here and developing my pupils knowledge and understanding of other cultures and sense of equality. 

I have tried, and will especially try to do with this new link, not make it about northern school giving money/resources to the southern school but about sharing a frienship and learning from each other.  What I really think we have to do is educate our pupils in how to bring about change both in their envrionment and at a higher level. 

I cited Cummins (1996) in my essay for this SQH unit who said there was a need to educate for global citizenship; to treat people equally and enforce the redistribution of wealth.

That last bit about enforcing the redistribution of wealth is the hardest part I think, and I don’t have much idea about how to go about this but my lightbulb moment is I’ll regret it if I don’t keep trying!  The inequality in the world and the unfair distribution of wealth is the one thing that makes me really angry….and I know I’m as bad as anyone else, I like my holidays and books and clothes but I’m going to think about that too – how I spend my money and do I need to!

This post ended up longer than I meant it to and is possibly the most personal post I have ever written on here but I thought even if I am the only one who reads it it was important to write it.  Now the hard part – to actually do something about it!


The Scottish Children’s Book Awards⤴

from

The Scottish Children’s Book Awards (formerly Royal Mail Awards) shortlist was announced recently.  Now schools, classes, book groups and individuals can register to take part and vote for their favourite book.

CALL Scotland, based at Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, can provide accessible digital and audio versions of the Scottish Children’s Book Awards shortlist.  The short list for each category is as follows:  

 Early Years (0 – 7 years)

  • Dear Vampa by Ross Collins
  • The Loon on the Moon by Emily Golden
  • Apple Pie ABC by Alison Murray

Younger Readers (8 – 11 years)

  • Zac and the Dream Pirates by Ross MacKenzie
  • There’s a Hamster in my Pocket by Franzeska G Ewart
  • The Case of the London Dragonfish by Joan Lennon

Older Readers (11 – 16 years)

  • Wasted by Nicola Morgan
  • The Blackhope Enigma by Teresa Flavin
  • The Prisoner of the Inquisition by Theresa Breslin 

CALL Scotland can provide the following formats:

  • Accessible digital versions of all shortlisted titles
  • Accessible audio versions (read by a computer voice) of the Older  and Younger  Readers shortlists 
  • Accessible audio versions (Power point with recorded voice) of the Early Years children’s shortlist (Loon on the Moon, Dear Vampa, ApplePie ABC)  

The older and younger reader shortlisted books are available in Adobe PDF and/or Microsoft Reader format. The three early years books are in Adobe PDF and Power point.

If you have pupils with additional support needs, please contact CALL  (http://www.books4all.org.uk/Book-Awards/Request-Digital-Book-Copy/)  to receive the books in accessible formats.

Please note that you must still register to take part in the awards, enter the review competition, or in order for your pupils to vote for their favourite book!

For more information, help and books go to CALL’s web site at http://www.books4all.org.uk/Book-Awards/ , contact Paul Nisbet paul.nisbet@ed.ac.uk , or phone 0131 651 6236.

For more information about CALL, please visit www.callscotland.org.uk.

 

Whose Town?⤴

from

Whose Town? is an innovative resource for teaching social studies. A fun and interactive digital resource which brings Edinburgh’s history to life, it has been made available to all Glow users.  It can be found in the Whose Town? Glow Group and accessed from the Glow National Site notice board. The resource is built on the City of Edinburgh’s heritage collections and is linked to the Curriculum for Excellence second, third and fourth levels.

Whose Town? looks at Edinburgh’s and Scotland’s past from 1850s to the 1950s through the eyes of people who lived there. There are 14 real lives to discover – people who lived in Victorian times, at the beginning of the twentieth century, during the Second World War and in the Fifties. Archival material is collected in a digital box and hidden in an attic for pupils to uncover and examine. Each life is captured at a particular point in history, creating a snapshot of their life: a Life in a Box.

Whose Town? features two lives with direct connections to East Lothian. Florence grew up in an affluent Victorian household and enjoyed holidays at the West Pans seaside with her family. Luca Scappaticcio arrived in Scotland from Italy at the turn of the twentieth century and settled in Musselburgh where he established what is now S. Luca’s of Musselburgh.

There are over 450 unique and original documents in digital format for topic and skills based work. Maps, newspaper articles, photographs, objects, documents, video and audio clips and even the bits and bobs that everyone collects are all used to bring the histories of the fourteen real lives to life. Whose Town? also contains a wealth of support materials for teachers from lesson plans to ideas on how to use archival materials in the classroom.   

For more information or to request a free Whose Town? CD contact the Digital Information Team at Central Library in Edinburgh on 0131 242 8047. You’ll also find a wide range of supporting mat

The Scottish Children’s Book Awards⤴

from

The Scottish Children’s Book Awards (formerly Royal Mail Awards) shortlist was announced recently.  Now schools, classes, book groups and individuals can register to take part and vote for their favourite book.

CALL Scotland, based at Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, can provide accessible digital and audio versions of the Scottish Children’s Book Awards shortlist.  The short list for each category is as follows:  

 Early Years (0 – 7 years)

  • Dear Vampa by Ross Collins
  • The Loon on the Moon by Emily Golden
  • Apple Pie ABC by Alison Murray

Younger Readers (8 – 11 years)

  • Zac and the Dream Pirates by Ross MacKenzie
  • There’s a Hamster in my Pocket by Franzeska G Ewart
  • The Case of the London Dragonfish by Joan Lennon

Older Readers (11 – 16 years)

  • Wasted by Nicola Morgan
  • The Blackhope Enigma by Teresa Flavin
  • The Prisoner of the Inquisition by Theresa Breslin 

CALL Scotland can provide the following formats:

  • Accessible digital versions of all shortlisted titles
  • Accessible audio versions (read by a computer voice) of the Older  and Younger  Readers shortlists 
  • Accessible audio versions (Power point with recorded voice) of the Early Years children’s shortlist (Loon on the Moon, Dear Vampa, ApplePie ABC)  

The older and younger reader shortlisted books are available in Adobe PDF and/or Microsoft Reader format. The three early years books are in Adobe PDF and Power point.

If you have pupils with additional support needs, please contact CALL  (http://www.books4all.org.uk/Book-Awards/Request-Digital-Book-Copy/)  to receive the books in accessible formats.

Please note that you must still register to take part in the awards, enter the review competition, or in order for your pupils to vote for their favourite book!

For more information, help and books go to CALL’s web site at http://www.books4all.org.uk/Book-Awards/ , contact Paul Nisbet paul.nisbet@ed.ac.uk , or phone 0131 651 6236.

For more information about CALL, please visit www.callscotland.org.uk.

 

Whose Town?⤴

from

Whose Town? is an innovative resource for teaching social studies. A fun and interactive digital resource which brings Edinburgh’s history to life, it has been made available to all Glow users.  It can be found in the Whose Town? Glow Group and accessed from the Glow National Site notice board. The resource is built on the City of Edinburgh’s heritage collections and is linked to the Curriculum for Excellence second, third and fourth levels.

Whose Town? looks at Edinburgh’s and Scotland’s past from 1850s to the 1950s through the eyes of people who lived there. There are 14 real lives to discover – people who lived in Victorian times, at the beginning of the twentieth century, during the Second World War and in the Fifties. Archival material is collected in a digital box and hidden in an attic for pupils to uncover and examine. Each life is captured at a particular point in history, creating a snapshot of their life: a Life in a Box.

Whose Town? features two lives with direct connections to East Lothian. Florence grew up in an affluent Victorian household and enjoyed holidays at the West Pans seaside with her family. Luca Scappaticcio arrived in Scotland from Italy at the turn of the twentieth century and settled in Musselburgh where he established what is now S. Luca’s of Musselburgh.

There are over 450 unique and original documents in digital format for topic and skills based work. Maps, newspaper articles, photographs, objects, documents, video and audio clips and even the bits and bobs that everyone collects are all used to bring the histories of the fourteen real lives to life. Whose Town? also contains a wealth of support materials for teachers from lesson plans to ideas on how to use archival materials in the classroom.   

For more information or to request a free Whose Town? CD contact the Digital Information Team at Central Library in Edinburgh on 0131 242 8047. You’ll also find a wide range of supporting mat

CPDConsolarium: GBL and Technologies loan service for Scottish schools⤴

from

Over the past few years the Consolarium team has invested in a variety of technical/digital equipment that it wanted to explore in relation to how its effective and innovative use could impact favourably and positively on teaching and learning contexts in settings from 3-18 years. We have been thinking how best we can utilise this […]

More from the MacWrites⤴

from

These are the links for the Aberdeenshire materials which work really well with the MacWrites. Thanks to all those at Aberdeenshire Libraries who created the materials and are allowing us to use them.

 Read it write it reference it booklet primary

 Read it write it reference it – teacher’s notes for primary booklet

Read it write it reference it poster

Referencing poster

Referencing Powerpoint

S1-S3 Referencing booklet

S4-S6 Referencing booklet

Webquest Design for Learning

 

 

More from the MacWrites⤴

from

These are the links for the Aberdeenshire materials which work really well with the MacWrites. Thanks to all those at Aberdeenshire Libraries who created the materials and are allowing us to use them.

 Read it write it reference it booklet primary

 Read it write it reference it – teacher’s notes for primary booklet

Read it write it reference it poster

Referencing poster

Referencing Powerpoint

S1-S3 Referencing booklet

S4-S6 Referencing booklet

Webquest Design for Learning