Monthly Archives: August 2011

Projectile Motion using Angry Birds⤴

from @ i teach physics

Used Tracker motion analysis today to help us understand more about how projectile motion works. The video below shows how to use the autotracker function to analyse the motion of the Angry Bird.



We used the analysis to figure out how the horizontal and vertical motion of the bird changed over time. We also calculated the approximate length of Angry Bird required to give an acceleration similar to gravity. The question sheet below was used as a guide.

Projectile Motion Using Angry Birds


Projectile Motion using Angry Birds⤴

from @ i teach physics

Used Tracker motion analysis today to help us understand more about how projectile motion works. The video below shows how to use the autotracker function to analyse the motion of the Angry Bird.



We used the analysis to figure out how the horizontal and vertical motion of the bird changed over time. We also calculated the approximate length of Angry Bird required to give an acceleration similar to gravity. The question sheet below was used as a guide.

Projectile Motion Using Angry Birds


Projectile Motion using Angry Birds⤴

from @ i teach physics

Used Tracker motion analysis today to help us understand more about how projectile motion works. The video below shows how to use the autotracker function to analyse the motion of the Angry Bird.



We used the analysis to figure out how the horizontal and vertical motion of the bird changed over time. We also calculated the approximate length of Angry Bird required to give an acceleration similar to gravity. The question sheet below was used as a guide.

Projectile Motion Using Angry Birds


Shane Sutherland- Personalising the Assessment Experience: PebblePad⤴

from

I like PebblePad. Why? Institutionally provided, personally controlled.
Shane Sutherland’s seminar on @PebblePad was extremely informative; and amusing for those of us paying close enough attention to spot his play on ‘student’ names, Atrick, Jerry, was my personal favourite. Composing myself enough that I didn’t share this humour with my best friend during his presentation, I was soon fully engaged in PebblePad and the wonders it holds.
My favourite aspect of the PebblePad ePortfolio was its adaptability. At the very start of the seminar, Shane commented that at all times you must know your audience, PebblePad allows you to pick and choose who you share information with, ensuring that certain things remain private between student and tutor, or can go public across the entire web, or you can simply save work for your own personal viewing; sending it on only when you are happy with it. In this sense PebblePad is almost like a personal PC on the web, hugely beneficial with information being able to be picked up, edited, saved and shared anywhere. The really great thing about controlling the content of your PebblePad is that it can potentially be used in all aspects of your life; personal, educational and professional.
In terms of eAssessment, PebblePad allows a student to submit a ‘working progress’ for feedback and advice from tutors; this not only enhancing the students learning curve, it allows the tutor to assess based on personal development. Feedback is instantaneous and the student can reply to the feedback for additional support, clarification, or to simply say ‘thanks’. These may all sound like fairly simply tools, but, as a recent graduate, I can assure you these simple forms of communication between tutor and student make a huge difference to a person’s learning experience; it’s nice just knowing that support is there.
I am also a huge fan of the fact that assessments are sent to tutors via links rather than PDF. This allows students to correct stupid errors that were missed when the assignment was first handed in without having to send the ‘Please ignore the first submission…’ e-mail; the link simply takes the tutor to the most recently saved piece of work! I did however wonder if the updates recorded date and time; I can imagine a lot of students would like to think they could get away with slyly updating a piece of work after the deadline…

Pamela Kato- “No Sweat” Simulating Stress for Young Doctors⤴

from

As a researcher for technology relating specifically to Primary and Secondary education, Pamela Kato’s (@pamkato) keynote was, I confess, one that I considered skipping. But, coffee in hand, I found myself sitting second row… and after about 20 seconds the coffee was all but forgotten. Like all the keynote speakers of the day Dr. Kato was vibrant and exciting; and ever so slightly terrifying with her comparison of deaths resulting from medical errors, in the US alone, being the equivalent to a jumbo jet crashing every day of the year- on the plus side I think she cured my fear of flying!
Dr Kato is, for all intents and purposes, a psychologist. Being intrigued by the above statistic, as many would be I am sure, she investigated the root causes of such medical errors, and while at times knowledge is a factor, the overwhelming factor is stress. Solution? Computer games!
My foray into the medical world doesn’t extend past the board game Operation, but I remember the stress well. Hands shaking, brow sweating, the pressure mounting to get that rubber band (do you remember the rubber band? It was the worst!) out without the earth shatter beeeeeeep that meant you had hit the metal wall…. consider that in real life; no longer 5, sitting in the comfort of your own home, playing with friends, but in the operating room with an actual life in your hands. Yeah, I can imagine there would be oodles of pressure. Enter Air Medic Sky 1, the grown-up, more serious Operation.
The interaction that the game allows amazed me. I loved that there was still fantasy, rather than a mega serious hospital mode, Air Medic Sky 1, is, surprisingly enough, set in the sky. The game face is beautiful and as realistic as I can imagine a computer game being. As Dr. Kato said, if the game isn’t fun, no one will play it and no one will learn. She expressed awe that institutions wanted to use this game for assessment purposes; I found no shock in this request, the game is the perfect learning tool and assessment platform. It promotes no stress learning; trial and error without consequences. This can only ever be a good thing; no an amazing thing! If students- from any academic area- can learn and be assessed without stress they will undoubtedly be more confident when they face the situation in the real world. I would never suggest that the virtual world should completely take over the real world for learning environments (especially in the medical profession! I like to know my doctor has treated an actual human before) but a combination of the virtual and real world, I believe, is the perfect concoction.
As a Law student, I was lucky enough to volunteer for the Citizen’s Advice Bureaux; the experience was invaluable, but I was dealing with real people and real problems. My first day (and my second and third…) was terrifying. However, I was also very fortunate to have a forward thinking, unique, creative lecturer who for two years in a row had us take on the role of a United Nations country and fight out their case in a mock Security Council setting. Not exactly virtual, but still I had the real life, without fear or repercussion (apart from a bad grade) experience. This type of learning and assessment is crucial for everything from preparation for the real world, confidence building, to successful learning (I received my best grade in this class).
I loved Pamela Kato’s keynote; it invited questions and ideas that I could never have imagined… and a desire to play computer games that I never had before….

Projectiles⤴

from @ i teach physics

We started off with the simplest type of projectile - those that are projected horizontally. They therefore have an initial vertical velocity of zero so are pretty much the same as our calculations on bouncing balls and the like.



Things get a little more complicated when you launch projectiles into the air at an angle because the initial vertical velocity is no longer zero. If this is the case then you must think about the horizontal velocity and the vertical velocity separately.

Projectiles⤴

from @ i teach physics

We started off with the simplest type of projectile - those that are projected horizontally. They therefore have an initial vertical velocity of zero so are pretty much the same as our calculations on bouncing balls and the like.



Things get a little more complicated when you launch projectiles into the air at an angle because the initial vertical velocity is no longer zero. If this is the case then you must think about the horizontal velocity and the vertical velocity separately.

Projectiles⤴

from @ i teach physics

We started off with the simplest type of projectile - those that are projected horizontally. They therefore have an initial vertical velocity of zero so are pretty much the same as our calculations on bouncing balls and the like.



Things get a little more complicated when you launch projectiles into the air at an angle because the initial vertical velocity is no longer zero. If this is the case then you must think about the horizontal velocity and the vertical velocity separately.

Ambition is Never Hallow⤴

from

As I read the above article in TES two, rather cliché, song lyrics played in my mind (this seems to be a habit of mine, I memorised revision topics using songs that reminded me of the subject).
“Fight for every dream, because who’s to know, which one you let go, would have made you complete…”
And the ever iconic “DON’T STOP BELIEVING!”
Actually I found myself internally screaming the Journey lyrics before I had even started reading the article… hollow ambition. I don’t think I have ever found two words so depressing; and when placed in the context of education, they are downright scary!
I fully appreciate the sentiment that giving education eloquent phrases, no matter how motivational, is not the answer because without action they are only phrases. This can be clearly illustrated by the struggle to implement the Curriculum for excellence. But, to discredit ambitions and dreams is a completely different scenario.
Yes action needs to be taken. Substance needs to be given to terms like Curriculum for Excellence and Achievement for All. We all know that one-size-doesn’t-fit-all, and every other inspirational quote flying around out there, but little is being done to actually realise the goals these one-liners stand for. Nevertheless, I, for one, would rather continue to see the encouragement machine churn out phrase after phrase, than see the demise of I can do anything I strive for. 

New Maths Educational Board Game Added To Keen2learn Range⤴

from

Keen2learn has just added some great new Numenko educational games for maths to their range. Coinciding with the news that children are still reluctant to learn maths these fun games can be played in school and at home by two – six players. A sound foundation in numeracy is essential to allow children to progress in maths and if this learning can be made to be fun the desire to learn can be accelerated through practice.

The UK is still failing in maths. Although the recent round of improved GCSE results were an improvement on last year there is a hidden concern. Maths, science and engineering are in decline replaced by a trend for children to take easier subjects in order to gain a better score and exam points. Our heritage is at stake, as our inventiveness will decline without a sound grounding in maths and more children than ever are dropping maths after they are 16 years old.

Many children find maths difficult because they can’t see the fun that can be had by playing maths games. Numenko is a board game using wooden tile to form maths answers in a crossword fashion similar to Scrabble. Addition, subtraction, division and multiplication form the answers on the board with the score being the answer to the statement. 6 x 2 =12 gives the player a score of twelve. The simplicity of the game makes it possible to for children of different ages to play. A second version of the game –Numenko in a Bag does away with the board to let children play anywhere – the winner is the first to use all their tiles.

Seeing how easy maths can become through playing Numenko will help children to break down any fear about maths which helps to build their confidence and develop a deep seated interest in numeracy.