Monthly Archives: July 2011

Reflections⤴

from



It's the summer holidays, and after two blissful weeks of spending time with my family and friends, crocheting, going to the gym and general pottering (as well as all the other things I rarely have time to do in term time), I feel my mind has cleared (somewhat!) and I can focus more on life outside teaching. Yes, it does take me this long to 'switch off' and adjust to an unstructured day.

I absolutely love my job, but  now teaching is at the back of my mind rather than the forefront. So in the misty recesses of my head, thoughts have been ticking over about this blog. It's been over a month since I started it, yet there's only one post published. Just why did I start it? I have 3 draft posts saved that I've not been brave enough to publish - it seems as soon as I write something, someone else does it better! For example, I wrote about my views on handwriting, and then saw this. My other drafts are frankly just havers (a very appropriate word).

So, what is the purpose of this blog? It's not primarily to share my views with the world, but to reflect on my teaching and experiences as a teacher in an attempt to become better. So why put it on the internet? I've realised then that this blog is like an online diary,  with the hope of becoming part of an online community of teachers and educators and sometimes getting feedback.

I think I need to be more specific in my ramblings, and blog about what I've been up to, and reflect on that. Of course I do have views on big issues, but I need to focus on my experiences and how they relate to these. I think I perhaps need to stop pondering quite so much, and just write!

So, once I get to the stage of my summer holiday when I'm planning for re-entering the world of education, I hope to post a great deal more. I have many exciting challenges awaiting me at the beginning of term, and in fact, just writing this post has started that ticking again in those misty recesses.... Hope you come back to see what I uncover!

Reflections⤴

from



It's the summer holidays, and after two blissful weeks of spending time with my family and friends, crocheting, going to the gym and general pottering (as well as all the other things I rarely have time to do in term time), I feel my mind has cleared (somewhat!) and I can focus more on life outside teaching. Yes, it does take me this long to 'switch off' and adjust to an unstructured day.

I absolutely love my job, but  now teaching is at the back of my mind rather than the forefront. So in the misty recesses of my head, thoughts have been ticking over about this blog. It's been over a month since I started it, yet there's only one post published. Just why did I start it? I have 3 draft posts saved that I've not been brave enough to publish - it seems as soon as I write something, someone else does it better! For example, I wrote about my views on handwriting, and then saw this. My other drafts are frankly just havers (a very appropriate word).

So, what is the purpose of this blog? It's not primarily to share my views with the world, but to reflect on my teaching and experiences as a teacher in an attempt to become better. So why put it on the internet? I've realised then that this blog is like an online diary,  with the hope of becoming part of an online community of teachers and educators and sometimes getting feedback.

I think I need to be more specific in my ramblings, and blog about what I've been up to, and reflect on that. Of course I do have views on big issues, but I need to focus on my experiences and how they relate to these. I think I perhaps need to stop pondering quite so much, and just write!

So, once I get to the stage of my summer holiday when I'm planning for re-entering the world of education, I hope to post a great deal more. I have many exciting challenges awaiting me at the beginning of term, and in fact, just writing this post has started that ticking again in those misty recesses.... Hope you come back to see what I uncover!

Panoramic Video for Learning⤴

from @ Digital Signposts

 
Screencast  - panning and zooming into 360deg video

Last week the delegates at the Diverse 2011 conference were  treated to a fascinating presentation by Dr Roy Pea, Professor of Education and Learning Sciences at Stanford  University, on using video for classroom observation. Roy described how he used a 360 degree Lucy videocam to develop a model for observing lessons and classroom interactions. The Lucy enables all corners of the class to be filmed simultaneously, together with the surrounding audio; and the DIVER software developed by Roy and his team lets viewers zoom in to, comment and annotate different parts of the video.  This  lets different viewers, including both researchers and trainee teachers, pick up on different events happening in the classroom simultaneously, and from different viewpoints. This method of audio-visual analysis brings together multiple perspectives resulting in a multilayered and multidimensional narratives.

Indeed, these video research techniques could be applied to other situations outside the classroom, a good situation might be an art gallery or museum, where the system could record data on visitors strategies and engagement with exhibits and resources. Of course filming in public spaces, and classroooms, raises ethical issues; and to be effective, needs to be consensual and offer privacy safeguards.

Roy also introduced the audience to  Dot, a panoramic camera lens for the iPhone 4, which  is due to launch and retail at around $99. This looks awesome, and makes 360 degree video capture avaialable at a consumer price point.  As you can see in the screencast above, I have been having a play with one of the video examples from the Kogeto site.  I think it really works with movement as you can follow and zoom in or out on the overtaking cars, or turn back to see something you have passed.  Because every viewing is a different experience, learners can draw their own meaning from a video sequence. Combining movement with multiple viewpoints offers remarkable opportunities for sport and travel based videos. Whether filming a walk through a neigbourhood, recording environmental spaces such as a wood, or simply placing the camera on a table during a conversation; the Dot is sure to offer opportunities for creating innovative video for learning.

 

 

Panoramic Video for Learning⤴

from @ Digital Signposts

 
Screencast  - panning and zooming into 360deg video

Last week the delegates at the Diverse 2011 conference were  treated to a fascinating presentation by Dr Roy Pea, Professor of Education and Learning Sciences at Stanford  University, on using video for classroom observation. Roy described how he used a 360 degree Lucy videocam to develop a model for observing lessons and classroom interactions. The Lucy enables all corners of the class to be filmed simultaneously, together with the surrounding audio; and the DIVER software developed by Roy and his team lets viewers zoom in to, comment and annotate different parts of the video.  This  lets different viewers, including both researchers and trainee teachers, pick up on different events happening in the classroom simultaneously, and from different viewpoints. This method of audio-visual analysis brings together multiple perspectives resulting in a multilayered and multidimensional narratives.

Indeed, these video research techniques could be applied to other situations outside the classroom, a good situation might be an art gallery or museum, where the system could record data on visitors strategies and engagement with exhibits and resources. Of course filming in public spaces, and classroooms, raises ethical issues; and to be effective, needs to be consensual and offer privacy safeguards.

Roy also introduced the audience to  Dot, a panoramic camera lens for the iPhone 4, which  is due to launch and retail at around $99. This looks awesome, and makes 360 degree video capture avaialable at a consumer price point.  As you can see in the screencast above, I have been having a play with one of the video examples from the Kogeto site.  I think it really works with movement as you can follow and zoom in or out on the overtaking cars, or turn back to see something you have passed.  Because every viewing is a different experience, learners can draw their own meaning from a video sequence. Combining movement with multiple viewpoints offers remarkable opportunities for sport and travel based videos. Whether filming a walk through a neigbourhood, recording environmental spaces such as a wood, or simply placing the camera on a table during a conversation; the Dot is sure to offer opportunities for creating innovative video for learning.

 

 

Panoramic Video for Learning⤴

from @ Digital Signposts

 
Screencast  - panning and zooming into 360deg video

Last week the delegates at the Diverse 2011 conference were  treated to a fascinating presentation by Dr Roy Pea, Professor of Education and Learning Sciences at Stanford  University, on using video for classroom observation. Roy described how he used a 360 degree Lucy videocam to develop a model for observing lessons and classroom interactions. The Lucy enables all corners of the class to be filmed simultaneously, together with the surrounding audio; and the DIVER software developed by Roy and his team lets viewers zoom in to, comment and annotate different parts of the video.  This  lets different viewers, including both researchers and trainee teachers, pick up on different events happening in the classroom simultaneously, and from different viewpoints. This method of audio-visual analysis brings together multiple perspectives resulting in a multilayered and multidimensional narratives.

Indeed, these video research techniques could be applied to other situations outside the classroom, a good situation might be an art gallery or museum, where the system could record data on visitors strategies and engagement with exhibits and resources. Of course filming in public spaces, and classroooms, raises ethical issues; and to be effective, needs to be consensual and offer privacy safeguards.

Roy also introduced the audience to  Dot, a panoramic camera lens for the iPhone 4, which  is due to launch and retail at around $99. This looks awesome, and makes 360 degree video capture avaialable at a consumer price point.  As you can see in the screencast above, I have been having a play with one of the video examples from the Kogeto site.  I think it really works with movement as you can follow and zoom in or out on the overtaking cars, or turn back to see something you have passed.  Because every viewing is a different experience, learners can draw their own meaning from a video sequence. Combining movement with multiple viewpoints offers remarkable opportunities for sport and travel based videos. Whether filming a walk through a neigbourhood, recording environmental spaces such as a wood, or simply placing the camera on a table during a conversation; the Dot is sure to offer opportunities for creating innovative video for learning.