Monthly Archives: September 2010

Glow Refresh and Glow Futur.es⤴

from

The Scottish Learning Festival has been and gone.  What a great, busy two days.  Exhausting but great to chat with so many teachers about Glow, what is working, and what needs to change.

The festival this year coincided with the Glow Refresh campaign, where we highlight what changes have taken place within Glow in recent months (more info and some jazzy videos showing what is new can be found here!)

We were also able to talk to lots of people about Glow, gather feedback, demo live and engage in conversations with practitioners from across Scotland.

Ross Watson (my colleague from the national team) held 2 great sessions on the Scottish Government stand talking about what we are doing.

I love engaging with teachers and others around the subject of Glow and the fab examples that I have been able to see as I work with teachers and students from across the country.   I also enjoy having conversations on the future of Glow and with people who are frustrated by it.

Dave Terron summed up the views of many on his blog this morning.  Click here to read his post and my reply.  John Sexton makes some good points re creative uses of technology and Glow on his blog.

I would urge ALL Glow users, in fact, all Scottish educators, to get involved in the future of Glow.  The Glow Futures team are working hard collating information, facts and thoughts from all over Scotland.  Please make sure your voice is heard by replying to one of their online questionnaires of discussion forums – link here.

ICT Complexities⤴

from @ ICT-Echo




Last week I was to give an interactive lecture and demonstration to the PGDE (Primary) cohort on interactive whiteboards (IWB). This involved me taking a Promethean activboard from an ICT lab to the allocated room which sat 100 students.

As an experienced ICT teacher I was aware of the complexities involved. I needed the IWB, a projector, a laptop and the associated cables. So 30 mins prior to the class I started the task of relocating the technology.

I got the board, the projector and the laptop into a lift to travel down two floors and the length of the building. I started setting up when I realised I needed a VGA splitter and an additional cable, so back up to the lab I went.

The laptop I had is a dual boot MacBook. So the day before I'd gone hunting for the installation discs. I could only find the PC version of the iwb software so that made the decision as to which operating system I would use.

I connected everything: laptop to the splitter, splitter to both of the projectors, board to the laptop and all parts to the power supply. The board beeped. The projectors lit up, but no signal was being received. I pressed some function keys in the hope that the signal would be refreshed. Next I restarted the laptop, looked away, and it restarted in Mac mode. The Mac desktop appeared on both screens. So I knew everything was connected correctly. So I restarted this time in PC mode but no signal was being received.

Now I was 15 mins into the class and still didn't have a working IWB. So I restarted into Mac mode and proceeded to give my presentation without it.

When I returned to my office I discussed my problem with my colleague. His suggestion was that the resolution on the PC needed to be reset to a lower setting. He was right. But why didn't I realise this?

In the heat of the class and with time running down I cut my losses and went with the simpler PowerPoint option. I could have spent longer setting up the equipment and get it working earlier. I could have asked the ICT technicians to set up the equipment. But I should have managed this myself: I'm an ICT teacher.

More importantly if I struggle with the technology how can we expect teachers with less experience in using ICT to cope?

When ICT complexity obstructs teaching it makes you question how effectively it can be embedded in the classroom.


- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

ICT Complexities⤴

from @ ICT-Echo




Last week I was to give an interactive lecture and demonstration to the PGDE (Primary) cohort on interactive whiteboards (IWB). This involved me taking a Promethean activboard from an ICT lab to the allocated room which sat 100 students.

As an experienced ICT teacher I was aware of the complexities involved. I needed the IWB, a projector, a laptop and the associated cables. So 30 mins prior to the class I started the task of relocating the technology.

I got the board, the projector and the laptop into a lift to travel down two floors and the length of the building. I started setting up when I realised I needed a VGA splitter and an additional cable, so back up to the lab I went.

The laptop I had is a dual boot MacBook. So the day before I'd gone hunting for the installation discs. I could only find the PC version of the iwb software so that made the decision as to which operating system I would use.

I connected everything: laptop to the splitter, splitter to both of the projectors, board to the laptop and all parts to the power supply. The board beeped. The projectors lit up, but no signal was being received. I pressed some function keys in the hope that the signal would be refreshed. Next I restarted the laptop, looked away, and it restarted in Mac mode. The Mac desktop appeared on both screens. So I knew everything was connected correctly. So I restarted this time in PC mode but no signal was being received.

Now I was 15 mins into the class and still didn't have a working IWB. So I restarted into Mac mode and proceeded to give my presentation without it.

When I returned to my office I discussed my problem with my colleague. His suggestion was that the resolution on the PC needed to be reset to a lower setting. He was right. But why didn't I realise this?

In the heat of the class and with time running down I cut my losses and went with the simpler PowerPoint option. I could have spent longer setting up the equipment and get it working earlier. I could have asked the ICT technicians to set up the equipment. But I should have managed this myself: I'm an ICT teacher.

More importantly if I struggle with the technology how can we expect teachers with less experience in using ICT to cope?

When ICT complexity obstructs teaching it makes you question how effectively it can be embedded in the classroom.


- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

Digital Natives or Digitally Naive⤴

from @ TecnoTeach

Are today's students really Digital Natives as Marc Prensky  defines them or are they just Digitally Naive?  Yes it is true that 'Students are not just using technology differently today, but are approaching their life and daily activities differently because of technology' (Prensky, 2006:40) however, is this change productive or counter productive?

Prensky (2006) discusses the key areas of change that Digital Natives have embraced shedding a positive light on each area.  Although there are many benefits to this technological change, there are many questions that could be raised in relation to change.

Digital Natives Communicate Differently

Digital Natives use an array of technologies that enable synchronous and asynchronous communication using their mobiles to text or Internet technology to instant message an array of people at one time.  Instant communication is at the forefront of their communication where they want quick, short responses rather than a lengthily wait for a response.

There are questions to be posed regarding this style of communication:

Can our Digital Natives focus on one thread of a conversation or are they hyperlinking between many?
Do they have the patience to wait for a response rather than demand instant communication?
Can they create well constructed correspondences that are well thought out, have depth and clearly communicate a view or opinion or do they quickly create and send?
Do they think before they communicate on their social media sites and what the implications of their words or images will have on a wider audience?

Digital Natives Share Differently

Today's technology opens the doors of closed in communities to share with the wider world whether others want to be informed or not.  Sharing is no longer confined to the physical aspect and location base restriction of collaboration but is extended through an array of technologies.  I am a great believer in sharing knowledge, ideas and skill with others but there are questions to be asked.

To share or not share that is the questions - do our Digital Natives share too much information or not?
Do our Digital Natives understand the repercussions of sharing various aspects of their life to an open audience?
Will out Digital Natives need to change their identities in the future to flee their online past that will haunt them?

Digital Natives Buy and Sell Differently

The high street stores are no longer the only means of purchasing products where they can adjust their price according to their location.  The Internet enables consumers the ability to shop around from the comfort of their homes to compare prices and read reviews created by others.  Consumers no longer need to rely on only the sale's representatives advertising pitch but those of the consumer.  The ability to sell products no longer requires the restrictions of building a business or standing in the cold on a Sunday at a local car boot sale.  The internet enables all to place products online to sell to a wider audience.  Again a few questions can be asked?

Do our Digital Natives understand the true value of money or do they just use a card number to purchase without any true thought for how much they are spending?
What will make a product stand out from the crowd when all are selling online?

Digital Natives Exchange Differently

Exchanging images, music and videos are at the heart of sharing at no cost to the recipient.  This raises the question:

Do our Digital Natives understand copyright or are they ignorant to ownership and permissions?

Digital Natives Create Differently

This is one area that our Digital Natives excel in where they create, co-create and innovate using technology.  Creating movies, websites, Apps, games etc are at the heart of many Digital Natives where they do not just want to consume information but create it.  There are excellent examples of Digital Natives using their creative skills in innovative ways however, there are a few that abuse the system and create content that is inappropriate.  Youtube is one area where Digital Natives like to create and share with a wider audience.  This leads to the question:

Do Digital Natives understand the implications of their creations on a wider audience?

Digital Natives Coordinate Differently

Working collaboratively online is one of the key attributes of today's technology and our Digital Natives embrace this aspect.  Working together anytime, anyplace, anywhere is now part of society rather than having to restrictions of location collaboration.  Working together to deepen knowledge or brainstorm ideas can be undertaken much simpler through connected technologies.  There are many excellent forms of collaboration taking place globally however the question that could be asked:

Does the voice of the crowd become a mob where there are no key players in some groups to facilitate and filter the lone expert voice from the crowd?

The above are just a few questions posed related to today's Digital Natives.  These questions are not all my views but ones that could be discussed by the global audience.  What are your views on Digital Natives from experience, research or your personal opinions?  Share these views and start a discussion with tomorrow's teachers who will be reflecting on Prensky's notion of Digital Natives over the next few days.


Digital Natives or Digitally Naive⤴

from @ TecnoTeach

Are today's students really Digital Natives as Marc Prensky  defines them or are they just Digitally Naive?  Yes it is true that 'Students are not just using technology differently today, but are approaching their life and daily activities differently because of technology' (Prensky, 2006:40) however, is this change productive or counter productive?

Prensky (2006) discusses the key areas of change that Digital Natives have embraced shedding a positive light on each area.  Although there are many benefits to this technological change, there are many questions that could be raised in relation to change.

Digital Natives Communicate Differently

Digital Natives use an array of technologies that enable synchronous and asynchronous communication using their mobiles to text or Internet technology to instant message an array of people at one time.  Instant communication is at the forefront of their communication where they want quick, short responses rather than a lengthily wait for a response.

There are questions to be posed regarding this style of communication:

Can our Digital Natives focus on one thread of a conversation or are they hyperlinking between many?
Do they have the patience to wait for a response rather than demand instant communication?
Can they create well constructed correspondences that are well thought out, have depth and clearly communicate a view or opinion or do they quickly create and send?
Do they think before they communicate on their social media sites and what the implications of their words or images will have on a wider audience?

Digital Natives Share Differently

Today's technology opens the doors of closed in communities to share with the wider world whether others want to be informed or not.  Sharing is no longer confined to the physical aspect and location base restriction of collaboration but is extended through an array of technologies.  I am a great believer in sharing knowledge, ideas and skill with others but there are questions to be asked.

To share or not share that is the questions - do our Digital Natives share too much information or not?
Do our Digital Natives understand the repercussions of sharing various aspects of their life to an open audience?
Will out Digital Natives need to change their identities in the future to flee their online past that will haunt them?

Digital Natives Buy and Sell Differently

The high street stores are no longer the only means of purchasing products where they can adjust their price according to their location.  The Internet enables consumers the ability to shop around from the comfort of their homes to compare prices and read reviews created by others.  Consumers no longer need to rely on only the sale's representatives advertising pitch but those of the consumer.  The ability to sell products no longer requires the restrictions of building a business or standing in the cold on a Sunday at a local car boot sale.  The internet enables all to place products online to sell to a wider audience.  Again a few questions can be asked?

Do our Digital Natives understand the true value of money or do they just use a card number to purchase without any true thought for how much they are spending?
What will make a product stand out from the crowd when all are selling online?

Digital Natives Exchange Differently

Exchanging images, music and videos are at the heart of sharing at no cost to the recipient.  This raises the question:

Do our Digital Natives understand copyright or are they ignorant to ownership and permissions?

Digital Natives Create Differently

This is one area that our Digital Natives excel in where they create, co-create and innovate using technology.  Creating movies, websites, Apps, games etc are at the heart of many Digital Natives where they do not just want to consume information but create it.  There are excellent examples of Digital Natives using their creative skills in innovative ways however, there are a few that abuse the system and create content that is inappropriate.  Youtube is one area where Digital Natives like to create and share with a wider audience.  This leads to the question:

Do Digital Natives understand the implications of their creations on a wider audience?

Digital Natives Coordinate Differently

Working collaboratively online is one of the key attributes of today's technology and our Digital Natives embrace this aspect.  Working together anytime, anyplace, anywhere is now part of society rather than having to restrictions of location collaboration.  Working together to deepen knowledge or brainstorm ideas can be undertaken much simpler through connected technologies.  There are many excellent forms of collaboration taking place globally however the question that could be asked:

Does the voice of the crowd become a mob where there are no key players in some groups to facilitate and filter the lone expert voice from the crowd?

The above are just a few questions posed related to today's Digital Natives.  These questions are not all my views but ones that could be discussed by the global audience.  What are your views on Digital Natives from experience, research or your personal opinions?  Share these views and start a discussion with tomorrow's teachers who will be reflecting on Prensky's notion of Digital Natives over the next few days.


iPod to iPad⤴

from @ ICT-Echo

This posting was created on my new iPad using BlogPress Lite for an iPod/iPhone.

I'm wondering if there's any point in using the app when I can access the webpage in Safari. The downside being that this is an iPhone app so I have to scale up the screen. There's also no facility to alter text style from within the app or to insert a link or. :-(

I can insert a photograph from the ones stored on my iPad.


Lastly to test the spoon my iPad I've tried to add a hyperlink to the word iPad.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad...

iPod to iPad⤴

from @ ICT-Echo

This posting was created on my new iPad using BlogPress Lite for an iPod/iPhone.

I'm wondering if there's any point in using the app when I can access the webpage in Safari. The downside being that this is an iPhone app so I have to scale up the screen. There's also no facility to alter text style from within the app or to insert a link or. :-(

I can insert a photograph from the ones stored on my iPad.


Lastly to test the spoon my iPad I've tried to add a hyperlink to the word iPad.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad...