Monthly Archives: October 2009

The wonder of BOB⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

I had a demo of the Box of Broadcasts (BoB) this week in one of our supported institutions - one of the first in the UK to subscribe to the service. BoB (developed by the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC), Cambridge Imaging Systems and img-bobBournmouth University) - provides staff and students with online  access to television and radio programmes from the previous seven days, as well as allowing staff and students to book recordings for broadcasts seven days in advance. Currently free view channels and radio are available. Library staff at Glasgow Met have implemented BoB and I was totally blown away by it.

The best feature in my view is the simple way you can create relevant snippets to use in class or provide for students through learning platforms or other web technologies that they use. This eliminates the need to watch a whole chunk of a programme when only a small relevant clip is really what's wanted. These can be tagged for other BoB users to find and it has the potential to become a huge source of contemporary, highly relevant and engaging video material.

Although it may be considered quite expensive to set up depending on licences that are currently in place, the librarians at Glasgow Met feel that it has had some unforeseen impact by providing a gateway into other library services and digital resources previously under utilised.

You can listen to the RSC's latest podcast about BoB here. For more information go to http://www.boxofbroadcasts.com/

The wonder of BOB⤴

from @ eCurriculum Blog

I had a demo of the Box of Broadcasts (BoB) this week in one of our supported institutions - one of the first in the UK to subscribe to the service. BoB (developed by the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC), Cambridge Imaging Systems and img-bobBournmouth University) - provides staff and students with online  access to television and radio programmes from the previous seven days, as well as allowing staff and students to book recordings for broadcasts seven days in advance. Currently free view channels and radio are available. Library staff at Glasgow Met have implemented BoB and I was totally blown away by it.

The best feature in my view is the simple way you can create relevant snippets to use in class or provide for students through learning platforms or other web technologies that they use. This eliminates the need to watch a whole chunk of a programme when only a small relevant clip is really what's wanted. These can be tagged for other BoB users to find and it has the potential to become a huge source of contemporary, highly relevant and engaging video material.

Although it may be considered quite expensive to set up depending on licences that are currently in place, the librarians at Glasgow Met feel that it has had some unforeseen impact by providing a gateway into other library services and digital resources previously under utilised.

You can listen to the RSC's latest podcast about BoB here. For more information go to http://www.boxofbroadcasts.com/

Let’s Tap: Good, good, good, good vibrations⤴

from @ @derekrobertson's...

Sometimes your best ideas for classroom practice can be found in the most unlikeliest of places. Well just the other day I think I stumbled upon another excellent opportunity for learning via a COTS game. I had heard about a game called Let's Tapfrom the Nintendo Wii and that the gameplay involved tapping the desk in order for the Wiimote to pick up the vibrations. Said vibrations would then control what happened in the game. Well. the most certainly do and I found myself playing this game for about an hour on Tuesday afternoon with my Development Officer at the Consolarium Brian McLaren. What larks we had and after an hour of mirth, discussion and competition the ladies in the main office in LTSDundee said that we were, "squealing like a couple of lassies!" (No sexist inference from me...just reporting what was said.)

Well what is Let's Tap? Have a look:


The game involved include:

Tap Runner: Sprint for the finish line in over 16 courses while avoiding obstacles including hurdles, ice wall and electric fields. (1-4 players)

Rhythm Tap: There are a wide range of songs to master in Rhythm Tap. Feel the beat and tap light, medium, hard in sync with the on-screen tap indicators. (1-4 players)

Silent Blocks: Different modes using light and hard taps to strategically remove blocks one at a time from the column without causing it to topple over. (1-4 players)

Bubble Voyager: Clad in a space suit, solo players tap to keep their character afloat through many levels filled with dangerous objects; a double tap will launch a missile. In multiplayer matches, you will shoot each other a number of times to win. (1-4 players)

Visualizer: Everyone will take their turn with several unique stages including Fireworks, Paint, River, Gem Game and Ink. Tapping with light, medium and hard strokes produces on-screen effects ranging from a fireworks display to undersea bubbles. In special tap sequences, various sea animals will appear. (1 player)

I feel that there is scope for the incorporation of all of the games in to the classroom in one way or another but the one that has really resonated with me is the Visualiser and the possibilities that this may have in the ASN context. Brian and I were lost in this part of the game and found ourselves orchestrating the most vivid and wildly beautiful firework displays, causing consternation in the coy pool or creating random Jackson Pollockesque canvases (ok maybe pushing it a little) by by tapping and banging on the table. The impact on a large projection screen within this game as a result of a simple tap or bang is just simply wonderful.

I'd very much like to see what this game could bring to the experiences of learners in the ASN context because of the simple way that players can engage with the game and the incredible return they get from a simple tap on a desk. I hope to report back on ways in which it has been put to use in schools very soon. I wholeheartedly recommend this game just for the fun aspect but yet again within a game designed for entertainment we see great educational potential.

welcome⤴

from @ digital learning foundation

The Digital Learning Foundation is an educational charity dedicated to assisting educators and students adopt new technologies and integrate them into everyday teaching and learning, while inspiring, motivating and making it fun!

We are currently updating this web site and moving from a static site, to a Drupal based, dynamic site. Thus, you will find parts of the site that are perhaps incomplete, or have formatting  or other errors. To help us catch these errors we have added a feedback link towards the bottom right of this page, please use this, we need your feedback!

You don't need to be registered to make comments or access the forums, as all posts are moderated to ensure this is safe place for school students to access.

We hope that you will bear with us, as we go through this transition to a much more interactive and social future.

Thank you.

welcome⤴

from @ digital learning foundation

The Digital Learning Foundation is an educational charity dedicated to assisting educators and students adopt new technologies and integrate them into everyday teaching and learning, while inspiring, motivating and making it fun!

We are currently updating this web site and moving from a static site, to a Drupal based, dynamic site. Thus, you will find parts of the site that are perhaps incomplete, or have formatting  or other errors. To help us catch these errors we have added a feedback link towards the bottom right of this page, please use this, we need your feedback!

You don't need to be registered to make comments or access the forums, as all posts are moderated to ensure this is safe place for school students to access.

We hope that you will bear with us, as we go through this transition to a much more interactive and social future.

Thank you.